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Doorking gate entry system

Discussion in 'Sensors and Actuators' started by banjomaniac, Dec 18, 2018.

  1. banjomaniac

    banjomaniac

    51
    2
    Mar 3, 2013
    I have a doorking 1803 entry system with a 1862-010 circuit board. It has a burned resistor that I'm trying to identify, I called DoorKing and they say they don't supply any parts or schematics so I've got a close up picture of the resistor but I have no wave of identifying the resistor. Any ideas? IMG_20181214_100937704-1728x2304.jpg
     
  2. Tha fios agaibh

    Tha fios agaibh

    1,854
    586
    Aug 11, 2014
    Unsolder it, and look at markings on/under the board. Doorking.com has manuals to download to help you identify.
    You have to find the other failed component(s) that lead this resistor frying.

    If the resistance reads open circuit, you can try gently scrapping the middle of the resistor with an exacto-knife while monitoring its resistance with a meter. The blade sometimes bridges a gap in the resistive material.
    Thanks @73's de Edd for teaching me this.

    If you need help finding the shorted component(s), post some clear pictures and perhaps we can help.
     
    ChosunOne likes this.
  3. banjomaniac

    banjomaniac

    51
    2
    Mar 3, 2013
    Thanks for the reply, I went ahead and pulled that resistor off the board and measured the resistance, it's 4700 ohms and in the book they have a makeup of this board not a schematic but it shows that resistor as 4700 ohms. So it might be ok, I'll check power coming into the board and try to follow that.

    Banjomaniac
     
  4. Tha fios agaibh

    Tha fios agaibh

    1,854
    586
    Aug 11, 2014
    Yes, 4.7k is a common resistor.
    I'd be looking for shorted components in surround area.
     
    ChosunOne likes this.
  5. ChosunOne

    ChosunOne

    307
    71
    Jun 20, 2010
    I once fixed a Kenmore washing machine by replacing a burnt resistor in the power circuit. When I found the schematic for the PCB, same model but updated, I found the resistor that had burnt was rated for 2W and the newer PCB version now used a 5W resistor ( same Ohm-rating). I replaced it with a 10W resistor and it worked fine after that. I'd take Tha fios agaibh's advice, and I'd also go to a higher power rating for your replacement resistor. Resistors are cheap.
     
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