Connect with us

DoesThis Exist? Thermally Coupled Fuses

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by D from BC, Mar 5, 2007.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. D from BC

    D from BC Guest

    Does this exist?

    It's kinda like an optocoupler but only with fuses.
    An input fuse and output fuse that's thermally coupled.
    Or in other words...
    A device that has two isolated fuses yet share the same heat.
    When fuse A blows, it also blows fuse B or vice versa..

    Since metal can't be used to couple the fuses together (isolation
    wanted) maybe fuse A can ignite a non conducting dry chemical to burn
    out fuse B.
    D from BC
     
  2. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    Ciruit breaker ?

    Graham
     
  3. John Barrett

    John Barrett Guest

    I dont know of a way to do it thermally -- are you sure you want to
    deliberatly burn something ?? but plenty of ways to do it electronically

    NC thermal switch driving a relay ?? relay inline on B driven by A.. i.e.
    when A blows, it interrupts the current to the coil, opening the relay on B
    ??

    Use 2 breakers ganged ??

    dont know what the A circuit has on it -- a little more info pls ??
     
  4. D from BC

    D from BC Guest

    Oh yeah... I've seen electrical box breakers ganged together with a
    clip. If one breaker trips..it takes out the other breaker...
    Can I can get that in the 1A to 5A range..??
    I neglected to mention the fuse rating of interest in my OP.
    oops...
    D from BC
     
  5. scada

    scada Guest

    Could you use a striker fuse? They have a shaft that pushes out when the
    fuse blows, that shaft usually is used to activate a microswitch.
     
  6. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    Oh yeah... I've seen electrical box breakers ganged together with a clip.
    If one breaker trips..it takes out the other breaker... Can I can get that
    in the 1A to 5A range..?? I neglected to mention the fuse rating of
    interest in my OP. oops...[/QUOTE]

    Digi-key has some, for about US$30-US$50 =:-O

    But they're out there somewhere. :)

    You _could_ get a couple of breakers and gang them with a piece of
    plastic and some glue. :)

    Good Luck!
    Rich
     
  7. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    Aim it at the other fuse's fuseholder, to pop it out when the first
    one blows. ;-)

    Cheers!
    Rich
     
  8. D from BC

    D from BC Guest

    I'm just curious if such a nonresettable fuse exists..
    It might be a part that could exist but is not in production.
    If it does exist...it probably would be about 5mmx10mm in size and be
    slow blow.
    I just came up with the idea while working on some failsafe circuits.
    D from BC
     
  9. D from BC

    D from BC Guest

    wow...that's something I haven't heard of...

    However..I forgot to mention in my OP that small size is of interest.
    Small like those fuses that look like resistors..
    Also a 1A to 5A rating...
    D from BC
     
  10. D from BC

    D from BC Guest

    lol
    D from BC
     
  11. maxfoo

    maxfoo Guest

    Have the 1st circuit fire a scr that blows the 2nd fuse.
     
  12. You might be able to do something like that with polyswitches. I think
    Raychem has some notes in thermally coupling them to improve
    parallelism. You'd have to experiment find what happens to the trip
    point, these are thermal devices so coupling them to another thermal
    mass will raise the trip point. I'm not sure I'd want to use it for
    significant voltage isolation, you'd need to check voltage isolation and
    worry about lead isolation.

    Robert
     
  13. D from BC

    D from BC Guest

    I wonder if that could get tricky if one needed lots of isolation
    between the cct with fuse 1 and the cct with fuse 2.
    D from BC
     
  14. Robert Baer

    Robert Baer Guest

    Use gunpowder or an azide for that ignition and burning...
     
  15. maxfoo

    maxfoo Guest

    trigger the scr with an optocoupler on most scr's Vgt is less than 1volt.
    SCR = 'solid combustible rocket' ummmm OKay...please post on youtube.
     
  16. Ross Herbert

    Ross Herbert Guest


    In the telephony world there are fuses which have a spring loaded
    plunger which is retained by the fuse wire in normal operation. When
    the fuse is ruptured due to overload the plunger is released to
    operate a contact which can then b used to initiate an alarm. You
    could use this alarm contact to perform any desired action subsequent
    to the fuse operating. Many different manufacturesrs will have their
    own designs and styles but here is the pdf for one type from a
    Japanese manufacturer;
    http://www.daitotusin.co.jp/english/contents/c_j/pdf/E_P4_PL4_P3_PL3F.pdf
     
  17. maxfoo

    maxfoo Guest

    A Photoscr (4n39) or a phototriac would give you isolation. Try Vishay, they may
    even have appnotes on what you're trying to accomplish.
     
  18. scada

    scada Guest

    Could you use a striker fuse? They have a shaft that pushes out when the
    fuse blows, that shaft usually is used to activate a microswitch.
     
  19. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "D from BC" <


    ** Sure.

    You just have to get a couple of fuses that are paid up members

    of the " Amalgamated Fuse and Circuit Breakers Union " .


    This is their motto :

    " One Out - All Out "




    ....... Phil
     
  20. ehsjr

    ehsjr Guest

    Does that mean that cams and gears and belcranks
    and linkages and solenoids, all connected together
    to operate a 5 pound rubber mallet to smash the other
    fuse when the first one blows, are out? :)

    But seriously - can you gate the supply to the
    second fuse with a mosfet only when voltage is available
    from the first fuse?

    Ed
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-