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Does electron die?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by RRITESH, May 18, 2016.

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  1. RRITESH

    RRITESH

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    Oct 10, 2010
    Hello,
    We generate electricity from Hydro power DAM /photovoltaci cell and then we get fan rotating.
    there is circulation of electron after fan where it go?
     
  2. Alec_t

    Alec_t

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    Jul 7, 2015
    Generating electricity doesn't actually create electrons; it just causes existing electrons in conductors to move around a circuit.
     
    RRITESH likes this.
  3. BobK

    BobK

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    Yep, for each electron you put out, you have get take one back. Sort of like enforced recycling.

    Bob
     
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  4. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    in a DC circuit, yes, they move VERY slowly around the circuit from the negative terminal to the positive terminal

    but in an AC hydro generator system, the electrons never leave the generator, they just oscillate back and forward about a point in the wire
    same with the ones in your AC house lighting and any other device



    Dave
     
  5. dorke

    dorke

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    A video clip that may help you.


    EDIT:
    "Does electron die?"
    No. they incarnate...;)
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2016
    Soganana and davenn like this.
  6. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    a nice basic one for DC :)
     
  7. RRITESH

    RRITESH

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    Oct 10, 2010
    So, we have lots of electron near us?
    The electron move from negative to positive side.
    why we say current in positive to negative?
    So, why we say crisis of electricity if there is lot of present electrons?

    In DC circuit the voltage is low so pressure is low they move slowly in AC they move very fastly due to high voltage pressure?
    And in ac the oscillation is 50/60hz?
     
  8. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    Electrons surround every atom in everything. The electrons in your feet (or shoes) support you because they are repelled by electrons on the ground beneath your feet. We live on a sea of electrons that shield the positive nucleus of every atom.


    You can blame Ben Franklin, an American statesman, philosopher, scientist, inventor, and lady's man for that. He had to pick a direction for current flow and he picked positive to negative. Ben didn't know about electrons and their negative charge. But as long as you are consistent, it doesn't matter which direction you pick for the direction of current flow. Get over it.

    What crisis of electricity? In Ohio they use a lot of coal, gas, oil, and nuclear fuel to make electricity. The electrons are just along for the ride. They don't create any energy by just being there. You have to create electrical energy from some other form of energy such as the momentum of falling water, or the heat from hot water, or the energy in photons of light collected on a solar voltaic cell.

    No, the electrons move about as fast in DC circuits as they do in AC circuits. It's crowded inside those wires, and the electrons have to make their way through the crowd at about the same speed no matter which way they are moving. They move at about the same speed you can walk. The electric field that moves the electrons propagates much faster, nearly at the speed of light in a wire.

    Mostly. Aircraft may use 400 Hz (need smaller, lighter, transformers and alternators and motors at that frequency) and there are other industries (trains for example) that may generate AC at whatever frequency they deem appropriate. But for commercial power distribution it is mostly 50 Hz and 60 Hz.
     
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  9. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    more than you can count

    do you know what an electron is ?

    it's an old thing, current flow direction was established long before the existence of electrons was known

    elaborate on what you mean by that ??

    not quite .... again google electrons and discover what they are about before we describe what happens in a circuit


    for most mains power systems, yes ... some countries use 50Hz generation systems, some use 60 Hz
    The country I'm in uses 50Hz

    Also be aware the term AC ( alternating current) isn't confined to mains power systems

    an audio signal is an alternating current, the voltages and currents in a radio transmitter or receiver are also alternating
    and usually much higher in frequency than the 50/60 Hz of mains power
    FM radio, for example, works on 88MHz to 108MHz


    Dave
     
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  10. RRITESH

    RRITESH

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    Oct 10, 2010
    Hello,

    I know this electron is negatively charged.


    [​IMG]


    ok,
    I was talking of different country and news non renewable source are finishing.

    The Electron are sitting between copper wire let say wire strands.
    and it depends on type of cable.
     
  11. RRITESH

    RRITESH

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    Oct 10, 2010
    Is there alternator like we have in vehicles in aeroplane also?
    why it is rated at 400hz they build AC
    new term 787 li-ion battery in it from google.
    what electrical engineer has to do job with aeroplane in it?
    In AC the electron oscillates what happen at different current.
     
  12. dorke

    dorke

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    Jun 20, 2015
    Hop,
    "They[Electrons] move at about the same speed you can walk".
    They actually move much much slower than a snail...;)

    The drift velocity of electrons in a copper wire is in the order of 10E-5 m/S
    (1Ampere in a 2mm diameter )
    It is dependent on the current density,the higher the current ,the higher the velocity.
     
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  13. RRITESH

    RRITESH

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    Oct 10, 2010
    Hello,
    new term drift velocity OK, i have studied about in class but was not sure with meaning at that time.
    the higher the current ,the higher the velocity
    higher voltage or current?


    A calculation shows that the electron is traveling at about 2,200 kilometers per second. That's less than 1% of the speed of light, but it's fast enough to get it around the Earth in just over 18 seconds. Read up on what happens when nothing can go faster than the speed of light.
    source
     
  14. dorke

    dorke

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    Jun 20, 2015
    The current density for a given wire(fixed cross section), translates to current.
    If you apply voltage to a wire with a known resistance, you can calculate the current, but that is not important.

    That velocity of 2200Km/sec is not in a conducting wire, and not of a free electron.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 19, 2016
  15. RRITESH

    RRITESH

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    Oct 10, 2010
    Then how to find Speed of electron in wire at different Voltage current?
     
  16. RRITESH

    RRITESH

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    Oct 10, 2010
    at high voltage we get shock ~48v why?
     
  17. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    It is independent from voltage or current, only from physical parameters of the wire.
     
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  18. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    Because man is not made to deal with high voltages. Nerves operate at millivolt levels, not tens of volts or more.
     
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  19. Sadlercomfort

    Sadlercomfort Ash

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    Feb 9, 2013
    If you were to calculate the speed of the electron, for example to switch on a 240AC light. It would take like 7 minutes for the light to come on..

    The electrons move slowly on a small scale, so what switches the light on instantly?

    As the electrons move in the conductor it produces a electromagnetic field and its this disturbance which propagates through the conductor close to the speed of light.


    It's convenient for us to understand a circuit where electrons are flowing.
     
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