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Direction, Rotation and Memory project

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Kobus Swart, Mar 9, 2015.

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  1. Kobus Swart

    Kobus Swart

    2
    0
    Mar 9, 2015
    Hi Guys

    I need some help with the following project as I have not done something like this before.

    I have a SME 2,4IN TFT LCD PANEL 320X240

    Now I want to do the following:

    I need to program a circle on to the LCD panel.

    Inside the circle I need to program an arrow in a general fix direction of x or y


    I need to program that the arrow can rotate inside the circle both ways

    I also need to program a push button in that when pressed saves the arrow print on screen.

    Switching the unit on and off will reset the saved arrows.

    Attached is illustrations of what I want to achieve.

    I will appreciate any help what so ever in the program and what Hardware I will need. Even a circuit diagram will help.

    Thanks a million
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Hellmut1956

    Hellmut1956

    53
    3
    Aug 11, 2014
    Great, so do a first try yourself and find out where you fail! evidently you are not burded with a lot of knowledge as you do not say anything about the system in which you have to do it! But I am sure this is because you will present us with this information based on the result of your first try, right?
     
    Gryd3 likes this.
  3. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

    4,378
    2,046
    Jun 21, 2012
    Is this the hardware you are trying to use? What microprocessor will you use to interface to the TFT Color LCD touch screen? How will you physically make the connections between the TFT LCD touch screen and the microprocessor? Have you downloaded and read the datasheets for the devices you will be using?

    I would suggest you learn how to program a circle and an arrow to display on an ordinary PC color monitor first. If you get that working, please take a screen shot or make a short video and upload to Electronics Point. Then we can talk about how to migrate your program to other hardware, such as your TFT Color LCD touch screen display.
     
  4. Hellmut1956

    Hellmut1956

    53
    3
    Aug 11, 2014
    @hevans1944: You are 12 years more experienced then I am. When I started to work for National Semiconductor as a Field Application Engineer in charge of the DP8500, a first graphic processor, as the TI34010 was, the engineers in the labs in Santa Clara California recommended me to buy the volume 1 of the "Inside Macintosh" books. Graphics were much simpler in those days, but the basics are still applicable today. In this book besides many other very valuable content there was also a lot of information about how to generate those graphics primitives our young friend still does not know. If I add to this what an valuable tool the Internet wisely used can be, I have for example started to fix the erosion of my mathematical skills by studying calculus for single variable and for multivariables as taught by the course calculus 1 and 2 made available and that you could find at the places with the links I put here. Goal is to get prepared to study mathematics for bachelor as part of my activities in my hobby. I am certain by searching a bit our young friend can find a place were what he wants to know is being teched in a way he likes. if he does so I am certain we all will do our best to help to overcome hurdles. Perseverance is a must to learn and get experience!
     
  5. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

    4,378
    2,046
    Jun 21, 2012
    @Hellmut1956: You are right of course. We all had to take baby steps when we began this journey. I don't think I would have stepped off into the deep end of the pool, so to speak, with such an ambitious project as this one appears to be. But, OTOH, we didn't have as many tools, or prior experience freely shared on the web, back then as we do now. So perhaps it's not as ambitious as I think it appears to be.

    When the IBM PC first came out there were already some primitive raster graphics programs first developed for popular 8-bit "hobby" micros (Intel 8080, Zilog Z80, Motorola 6800, and several others), mainly by enthusiasts who built their own machines (including CRT display controllers) from scratch. In the early 1980s I was still working with commercial vector graphic displays while trying to convince government customers that raster-scanned color bit-mapped displays were "the next great thing". This eventually happened, but not through any great effort on my part. Programs like Corel Draw and Microsoft Paint ran rings around vector graphic generators and the monitors used for their display. And the arrival of very large scale integrated logic, including not just microprocessors but FPGAs and DSPs and RISC processors... on and on ad infinitem... added to the momentum away from vector graphic displays to bit-mapped displays with vector-to-raster conversion hardware. Add in to this mix the emergence of digital imaging and ray-trace rendering of CAD designs on PC platforms instead of dedicated work stations, and the display world turned upside down. Back in the day, about the time Pixar was invented, I used to attend SIGGRAPH conventions where state-of-the-art developments were usually first announced. I was not too surprised to see Hollywood latch onto the new technology and pour millions of dollars into its development. At the time I believed the goal was to replace real actors, living or dead, with computer-generated equivalents (as in the 1981 movie Looker). We are almost there today.

    So, it should be a pretty simple matter to write a program that displays a circle and a few lines on a PC monitor. It may not be so simple to port the code to more primitive hardware, but one must crawl before attempting to walk or run. I have a Seeed TFT color LCD touch-screen shield that I plan to use with an Arduino Uno. Perhaps I will take a crack at programming this thing to act as a compass display in conjunction with a sensitive Hall sensor.
     
  6. Hellmut1956

    Hellmut1956

    53
    3
    Aug 11, 2014
    I also joined SIGGRAPH in 1986!
     
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