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Different Types of Rotary Switches

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Jake, Apr 8, 2004.

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  1. Jake

    Jake Guest

    Could someone help me understand what the different types of rotary
    switches do? Google searches have just turned up online stores. I'd like
    to know what the differences between shorting, non-shorting, and
    hexadecimal coded rotary switches are.

    Thank you,
    Jake
     
  2. CFoley1064

    CFoley1064 Guest

    Subject: Different Types of Rotary Switches
    Good morning, Jake. Shorting and non-shorting have to do with what happens
    when a rotary switch is switched from one position to another. A "shorting"
    switch, when switching from, say, position 1 to position 2, is guaranteed to at
    least mometarily be making contact between the switch common, pos. 1 and pos. 2
    at the same time. A "non-shorting" switch will at least momentarily have the
    switch common be neither making contact with Pos. 1 or Pos. 2 when it is
    switched. This can be of significance if, for instance, you're switching
    between loads in an application where you can't have an open circuit. For that
    you'd want a shorting-type. A non-shorting type would be important if, for
    example, you had several logic-type outputs being switched to one common, where
    you wouldn't want two conflicting outputs to short together. Most rotary
    switches are non-shorting, but you should check first if it's important.

    Various multi-pole switches are called "decimal" or "hexadecimal". These are 4
    pole, 10- or 16-throw switches that are hard-wired internally so that, if you
    wire them correctly, their outputs will "count" in binary from 0 (0000) up to
    10 (1010) or F (1111). These switches can either be "non-inverted" (contact
    closes for 1) or inverted (contact closes for 0). You would wire them up so
    you would get the desired binary output.

    Good luck
    Chris
     
  3. CFoley1064

    CFoley1064 Guest

    Subject: Different Types of Rotary Switches
    Good morning, Jake. Shorting and non-shorting have to do with what happens
    when a rotary switch is switched from one position to another. A "shorting"
    switch, when switching from, say, position 1 to position 2, is guaranteed to at
    least mometarily be making contact between the switch common, pos. 1 and pos. 2
    at the same time. A "non-shorting" switch will at least momentarily have the
    switch common be neither making contact with Pos. 1 or Pos. 2 when it is
    switched. This can be of significance if, for instance, you're switching
    between loads in an application where you can't have an open circuit. For that
    you'd want a shorting-type. A non-shorting type would be important if, for
    example, you had several logic-type outputs being switched to one common, where
    you wouldn't want two conflicting outputs to short together. Most rotary
    switches are non-shorting, but you should check first if it's important.

    Various multi-pole switches are called "decimal" or "hexadecimal". These are 4
    pole, 10- or 16-throw switches that are hard-wired internally so that, if you
    wire them correctly, their outputs will "count" in binary from 0 (0000) up to
    10 (1010) or F (1111). These switches can either be "non-inverted" (contact
    closes for 1) or inverted (contact closes for 0). You would wire them up so
    you would get the desired binary output.

    As an example, the hexadecimal switch below is non-inverting, and is set for
    position "E" (decimal 14, binary 1110).

    Hexadecimal Switch
    VCC
    +
    |
    ..----------o-------------.
    | Common |
    | |
    | "E" |
    | |
    | Hexadecimal Switch |
    | 8 4 2 1 |
    '-o-----o-----o-----o----'
    | | | |
    o--. o--. o--. o--.
    | | | | | | | |
    .-. | .-. | .-. | .-. |
    |R| | |R| | |R| | |R| |
    | | | | | | | | | | | |
    '-' | '-' | '-' | '-' |
    | | | | | | | |
    === | === | === | === |
    GND | GND | GND | GND |
    | | | |
    o o o o
    1 1 1 0

    created by Andy´s ASCII-Circuit v1.24.140803 Beta www.tech-chat.de


    Good luck
    Chris
     
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