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Difference Between 5K and 10K?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by MrClamperSir, Mar 9, 2016.

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  1. MrClamperSir

    MrClamperSir

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    Feb 3, 2016
    Besides the obvious, I am wondering what the difference is between 5K pot and 10K pot. The schematic I'm using has the VR1 listed as 10K. I only had a 5K pot on hand so I used it. It seems to run just fine.

    Is there any reason I should order a 10K when I built my final PSU?

    Thank you
     
  2. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    You will have to provide your schematic for any answer to that.
     
    davenn likes this.
  3. Gryd3

    Gryd3

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    Jun 25, 2014
    I can briefly cover 'typical uses' and see what applies.
    The 3 terminals on a potentiometer are often either used as a variable voltage divider, or as a variable resistor.
    A variable voltage divider puts pin 1 and pin 3 on VCC and GND, while the 'wiper' on pin 2 goes to a microcontroller or other voltage sensitive 'input'. The value of the potentiometer in this instance does not make much of a difference. A lower value may waste more power and too low can cause the potentiometer to fail.
    Using it as a variable resistor requires a proper value to be selected. You 'Can' fudge the value though... if you design for a 10K but the desired result occurs when the potentiometer is set to less than 5K then you can use a 5K... you cannot use lower, and you can most certainly use higher. Using lower reduced the amount of adjustment you have, and using higher will make the adjustment feel clumsy and over-sensitive.

    There are other cases of course, and we cant say exactly which until we see the circuit.
     
    MrClamperSir likes this.
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    My crystal ball is cloudy. I can't quite make out the schematic.

    Can you post it so we don't have to rely on clairvoyance?
     
  5. Gryd3

    Gryd3

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    Jun 25, 2014
    If you are only using 1 and 2, then it's not a divider... A divider uses 1 and 3 for power and ground, and pin2 can be adjusted to any voltage inbetween... you cannot do this with two pins.
    In your application, you would be limiting yourself or operating our of spec.
    I don't really have much else to say till I see a schematic though. I'm guessing based on details you are sharing, but there are lots of details that arent available.
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    If R1 is 120R then the voltage should top out at waaaaay above 5V.

    The problem is most likely that you've wired up something wrong if the transformer secondary is indeed 16VAC.
     
  7. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    If R1 is actually 12R then the voltage will top out at just above 5V.
     
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