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Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by RushingDaGawd, Jul 28, 2014.

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  1. RushingDaGawd

    RushingDaGawd

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    Jul 26, 2014
    I'm new to the electronic design world but would like to learn more, when wanting to design a circuit under what circumstances would a transistor be a useful tool and when would a op-amp be useful. Furthermore, when you have an idea of what you want to make, what is usually your thought process to begin designing the circuit?
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Your question is akin to saying that you are new to this planet and wonder when cows and buffalos would be useful. It's hard to answer the question because you have no points of reference.

    Transistors can be used to amplify or switch and op-amps can be used to amplify, compare voltages, and perform mathematical-like transformations to voltages.
     
  3. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    HI there RushingDaGawd
    welcome to the forums :)

    As Steve said its a little difficult to give an easy answer to that
    Look to a local tech college for electronics courses night classes etc
    buy some books on electronics basics. Have a look in our resources section for book suggestions
    do lots of googling for electronics teaching sites and start reading and learning

    you have a long but fun road ahead of you, are you up for the challenge ?

    cheers
    Dave
     
  4. RushingDaGawd

    RushingDaGawd

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    Jul 26, 2014
    I understand the basic operations and which each does although. I've never had to use them practically to build a circuit nor do I know how to take an idea and start constructing it.
     
  5. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    Yup OK :)

    reread my last post and start your studies :)
    buy some kit sets and get the practical side of construction started

    regards
    Dave
     
  6. RushingDaGawd

    RushingDaGawd

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    Jul 26, 2014
    Which kit sets do you suggest?
     
  7. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    Ones that interest you.

    Bob
     
  8. shumifan50

    shumifan50

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    Jan 16, 2014
    What I found is that initially I only bought the components that I needed for a specific project. As you do more projects you will identify the components that are your preferences. This is especially true for ICs. If I needed an IC for the first time, I usually buy 2 of them, in case I fry one.
    Here in the UK most deliveries are 'next day', so 'buy what you need' is not too bad. As far as resistors/caps are concerned the lists above seem good. I found that buying componets in bulk(100 at a time) reduces the price to less than a penny each for resistors as an example.
    When dealing with Farnell/Element14 quantity breaks are quite low and I find that going from 2 to 5 can cost very little extra(specifically microcontrollers).
     
  9. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009

    hi

    do a google search on electronic kits sales
    you are sure to get lots of hits start off with some basic ones and over the months etc, as you gain confidence,
    get more complex ones
    Read the kit circuit descriptions well. Read the tutorials on www sites, such as this one, and slowly build up a knowledge
    of what the individual components do and their function in the kit circuit you are playing with :)

    If you have specific questions, post links to the circuit concerned, and comment ....
    I understand this bit, but I don't understand that bit .... etc :)

    just remember ... you are NOT going to learn it all in a few weeks or months
    Us guys have been into electronics for years and years and we all are still learning
    I started playing with bulbs, motors and batteries etc when I was around 7 years old. I'm now 55 yo
    and I still don't know it all ;)

    Dave
     
  10. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Added to what Dave says, if you get a kit that is just parts and a quick guide to construction, you'll probably learn to solder.

    If you want to learn electronics, then find a supplier of kits that includes comprehensive notes and explanations of the circuit and its operation.

    You may be better off getting a subscription to a magazine where the projects described are either available as kits, or where you are confident you can source the components yourself. In the latter case, sourcing any printed circuit boards is likely to be a major issue.

    I understand the desire to build something (and possibly to build something useful) but there are layers and layer of understanding behind the design of such things. If you want to get to the point where you can design a circuit to solve a problem you will need a deep understanding that kits can't provide. Having said that, there's nothing wrong with starting off with a project that has a good chance of success, and kits generally fall into that category.
     
    davenn likes this.
  11. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    Thanks Steve

    I should have taken the kits comment a little further

    Dave
     
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