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Design of Push Buttons

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by jakebalisbis, Jun 30, 2011.

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  1. jakebalisbis

    jakebalisbis

    2
    0
    Jun 30, 2011
    Hi,

    Good day!

    I have a project which compose of 5 push buttons and 5 lamps. Each button is assign to each lamp. I want to make an elevator-type-push-button wherein when you "tap" the elevator button it lights up the lamp. The person will only tap the push button and the lamp will light with no need for the person to press hold the push button.

    At any given point in time, only one lamp will be activated. Meaning if the person tap another push button, the assign lamp will lit and the last active lamp will switch off. Hope you may share with me the needed components and schematic diagram to complete this project.

    regards,

    philip
     
  2. daddles

    daddles

    443
    3
    Jun 10, 2011
    Welcome to the forum!

    If I was facing this task, I've got a tube of some PIC 16F690 processors and I'd just quickly wire up a board and write a little firmware and have things working in short order. Total parts: 5 switches, 5 LEDs, the processor, a chunk of PC board, a wall wart for power, and a box to put it in.

    I'm sure someone else will propose a digital logic solution with some TTL or CMOS chips and no doubt there's an analog approach too.

    Let us know what tools/skills/experience/interests you have available and a suitable approach can be chosen.
     
  3. poor mystic

    poor mystic

    1,071
    33
    Apr 8, 2011
    ...old telephone techs like me can even find solutions using relays, Daddles
    But you've got my attention with the PIC idea. It sounds like you consider the problem trivial for a PIC, and I'll be looking into getting some and finding out for myself.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2011
  4. daddles

    daddles

    443
    3
    Jun 10, 2011
    poor mystic, I was lucky in that a young friend (he's about the age of my stepson) visited for a week from across the country last February and wanted to play with some microcontroller stuff. He bought a bunch of stuff from the Microchip website and we taught ourselves the basics during that week.

    The two main kits that I recommend from Microchip are: 1) the Low Parts Count Demo board and 2) the PICDEM Lab.

    The LPCD is what we spent our time with, as it is the simplest (IIRC, it was around $50 US and was a good value for the money). It has a PIC 16F690 chip (28 pins) on a PC board and comes with the PICkit 2 programmer. You download the MPLAB assembler and tools from the Microchip website and things run on a Windows machine. The board has four LEDs, a pot, and a pushbutton switch plus room for some prototyping. All this stuff would fit in your shirt pocket. There are 12 lessons. The lessons are all in assembly language; normally, I'd rather program in at least C, but in this case learning the assembly is good because it teaches you the chip's architecture. Go through all the lessons, as you'll learn all the basics like analog inputs, digital I/O, interrupts and ISRs, and the mechanics of getting things to build and run. For someone on a budget and not much space, this is what I would recommend. Once you've gone through the tutorials, your mind will race with all the things you can see you can do with that 28 pin chip (get a few extra, as you will want to play). You'll also like the low power features. The data sheet is over 300 pages, so there's a lot to learn.

    For around $125, the PICDEM Lab is a better choice for the electrical experimenter. It comes with a prototyping board, a number of sockets for different PIC processors, and an on-board power supply that runs from a wall wart. Also, there are all the wires and components to make up the tutorial circuits (for example, one of the tutorials makes a temperature-controlled oscillator that drives a little speaker using a MOSFET; a thermistor senses the temperature). An advantage of the PICDEM Lab is that you also work in C and the tutorials' documentation is a bit more polished. It comes with the PICkit 3, which is a later model and a bit more capable. However, Microkit rather dumbly left out the neat software app that comes with the PICkit 2 (EEVblog does a justifiable rant on this). I found I prefer to use the PICkit 2 over the 3. Note that you can't do in-circuit debugging with the PICkit 2 without buying a header circuit for the 16F690 (we used the PICkit 3 to do some ICE with a different processor board and it worked fine). For an electrical experimenter, I think the PICDEM Lab is definitely the way to go if you can hork up the bucks.
     
  5. poor mystic

    poor mystic

    1,071
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    Apr 8, 2011
    You read my mind quite accurately Daddles
    That's exactly what I wanted to know.

    As for you, Philip, who started the thread, please do "Let us know what tools/skills/experience/interests you have available and a suitable approach can be chosen" as Daddles has suggested.
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,497
    2,838
    Jan 21, 2010
    For people who are beginners to programming, I would recommend a PICaxe kit. (Note that you need a special serial (or USB) cable to program the chip). The cheapest combination of kit and cable is around $US21
     
  7. poor mystic

    poor mystic

    1,071
    33
    Apr 8, 2011
    Holy wow! that is so cheap!
    Philip, I hope you're taking notice of this. It's probably the best method by which you could perform this task. I'm sure it must be among the cheapest and tidiest.
     
  8. jakebalisbis

    jakebalisbis

    2
    0
    Jun 30, 2011
    Thank you sir

    Hi all,

    Thanks for the suggestions. I'll try to work this out and inform you guys how it worked out. Actually, I have only few ideas (better say "zero") on electronics but i'll try to figure this out and shall get back to you. =)

    regards,

    philip
     
  9. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,497
    2,838
    Jan 21, 2010
    Actually, whilst the PICaxe-08M is great to lean on, it would be tricky to perform this task with it due to the small number of I/O pins it has (you could do it, but it would require some tricks).

    Getting that starter kit and a larger PICaxe (say a 14) should give you plenty of I/O to do it the simplest and easiest way. (The chip is $3.95 from the same source).
     
  10. poor mystic

    poor mystic

    1,071
    33
    Apr 8, 2011
    Y' see one way or another you're going to have to learn a technology... we could design a machine with the proper functionality out of almost anything in principle from reed relays to ice-cream sticks and mirrors and rubber bands. You might as well make your learning curve worthwhile do you see what I mean?
    Now there isn't as much to learn as you'd think, and there's plenty of help on the net, so keep yr chin up and give it an honest hit. Look how cheap it is! and how tidy! Things in electronics last if they're tidy and tend to die (of neglect if nothing else) if they're a mess.
    This kind of rhetoric is like shifting a big load that doesn't know whether it wants to be shifted. We go 1, 2, 3... in this case I'll give one more big push... this is the kind of solution that modern electronics is coming to. Now you wouldn't want a valve-based solution or a relay solution, but they'd be a lot more difficult to learn (and so would transistors) than simple programming. And, when you've got a good start on this technology (which might take a couple of months) you will be able to accomplish so much!

    If you badly want to learn tradirional electronics with gates and op-amps and transistors and chips (and it's not a bad idea to know those things really) you need the best textbook that's ever been written on the subject: "The Art of Electronics" by Horowitz and Hill.
    Of course you're welcome to ask as many questions as you like. I have given an assertve answer but it's not the last word in Truth... there may well be other replies that'll be more suitable for you.
    Good luck!
    Mark
     
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