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Delayed buzzer for Motorbike

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Sree, Dec 11, 2015.

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  1. Sree

    Sree

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    Dec 11, 2015
    I want to add a safety feature for my motorbike to turn signal indicators

    For that, I need to create a circuit with a buzzer. The battery of the vehicle is 12V 5 Amp DC.

    If I turn on the left or right turn signal indicators or both (hazard light), I wish to buzz the buzzer only after each 10 flashes of the indicator.

    I am attaching a picture along with to show the desired circuit .

    Please help me circ.jpg
    Attach the real circuit diagram with all component specification, Please
    I am a beginner in electronics.:)
     
  2. duke37

    duke37

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    Jan 9, 2011
    I do not have time to design your circuit in detail, perhaps you could do it yourself.
    You could use a schmitt trigger (4093 or 40106) to debounce the input and then feed the signal to a 4017 Johnson decade counter. A reset input would be necessary.
     
  3. Gryd3

    Gryd3

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    Jun 25, 2014
    lol.
    Forgetting to turn off your turn-signals?

    A decade counter would be perfect for this task, and is an easy component to learn with as a beginner.
    What if you are stopped at a left-hand turn with your blinker on? You still want it to buzz at you?
    I hate to say it, but managing the turn signal is one of those things you need to keep on top of. Just like shoulder checking, and covering your break as you approach intersections... those pesky drivers in their 4-wheel vehicles don't normally see us, so you need to be observant. (the blinking indicator next to the speedometer should be a great indicator)
     
  4. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

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    May 12, 2015
    As soon as the OP posted I thought of a 4017.
    But as I don't require two 'loser' badges , I stayed silent!
    Perhaps it wasn't such a bad idea after all...

    Martin
     
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  5. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Jun 10, 2015
    You want the circuit to be powered by the battery *after* the ignition switch, so it isn't drawing any current when the bike is off. Then, the circuit board needs inputs from both the input and output sides of the turn signal blinker. These get cleaned up with a noise filter and transient suppression, then drive a CD4017 counter. The counter has a power-on reset circuit (one resistor and one capacitor) to make sure it always powers up correctly when blinking starts. The blinker output increments the counter, and the 10th counter output drives the buzzer through a driver transistor.

    One chip, some Rs and Cs, one transistor, the buzzer... Does this sound like something you can build on perf board?

    ak
     
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  6. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Jun 10, 2015
    Something like this.

    ak
    TurnSignalBuzzer-1-c.gif
     

    Attached Files:

    Sree and duke37 like this.
  7. duke37

    duke37

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    Jan 9, 2011
    If D1 was paralleled with another diode to get power from left and right blinker and C1 made much bigger, then a separate power supply may not be needed.
    Two blinker inputs through diodes and a 1k across D2 would give a good clock from either side.

    My book says that the input rise time should be less than 5μs so a schmitt trigger to may be advantageous.
     
  8. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    Personally I wouldn't want it to count 10 flashes and trigger a continual buzzer. More tolerable for those times when waiting to turn would be a beep every 10 flashes.

    Chris
     
  9. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Jun 10, 2015
    That is what the OP requested.

    ak
     
  10. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    Uh, yeah ... I didn't see that specified in his text but I see it now in his attachment. I also see that your circuit complies with that.

    Chris
     
  11. Colin Mitchell

    Colin Mitchell

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    Aug 31, 2014
    Whats the purpose of D2 D3 R1 and C3 ????
    Just a simple transistor on the output would be needed as the beeper takes less than 100mA
     
  12. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Jun 10, 2015
    R1 and C3 form a power-on reset. The circuit powers up every time a turn is initiated, and the 4017 is not guaranteed to start in any particular state.

    D2 and D3 work with R2 for input transient suppression. I assumed that bike signals are at least as dirty as car signals.

    There is a simple transistor on the output, so I don't know what you are referring to there.

    Also, the design assumes a piezo beeper. For an electromechanical buzzer, add a suppression diode across its inputs.

    ak
     
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  13. duke37

    duke37

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    Jan 9, 2011
    D2 and D3 are to protect the input from power supply spikes.

    R1 and C3 produces a reset on switch on so that the counter starts at the very beginning, a very good place to start.:)

    Snap!
     
  14. Colin Mitchell

    Colin Mitchell

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    Aug 31, 2014
    If you haven't enabled the chip, are you sure you can reset it.
    The chip has input protection diodes to handle 1mA
     
  15. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Jun 10, 2015
    As the internal schematic of the 4017 shows, the enable (or inhibit) input gates the clock only, and has no effect on the reset function. In fact, you can use the enable input as a negative-going clock input and the clock input as a positive-going enable.

    Experience indicates that CMOS internal protection is not sufficient for most industrial and automotive environments.

    ak
     
  16. GPG

    GPG

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    Have made controllers for various highway marker/tar sprayer vehicles and always buffered all inputs and outputs with transistors. No failures. On the reverse, gear I made to transmit river level info installed in an area that got lightning occasionally would destroy chips regularly in spite of the gear being inside a metal tank and inside a metal equipment enclosure.
     
  17. Sree

    Sree

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    Dec 11, 2015
    Thank u ak
    I m so thankful to u
     
  18. Sree

    Sree

    17
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    Dec 11, 2015
    Dear ak
    I am a hobbyist in electronics. So I do not have fully understood your diagram. Please reply me to clarify my doubts please......(I marked it in red in the attached diagram)

    1. I think the +12V you meant, it is from the battery +ve directly. Is it?
    2. I think the 'Earthing' you meant, it is from the battery -ve directly. Is it?
    3. 'Blinker power' means? (From/to the connection leads to?)
    4. 'Blinker input' means? (From/to the connection leads to?)
    5. 'Earthing' (in the red middle circle) means? (From/to the connection leads to?)
    6. How the circuit from the '11' from IC? (Using the transistor)

    hope your reply
     

    Attached Files:

  19. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Jun 10, 2015
    Protecting circuits from lightning strikes is entirely doable, but it takes attention to some...uncommon...details. MIL-STD-464 defines a lightning strike as a 218,810 ampere transient that drops to 11,300 amperes for 5 milliseconds, then settles down to 400 amperes for 1/2 second. That's a lot, the corresponding electric and magnetic field strengths are enormous, and designing for this environment makes for expensive connectors and materials. But it is done every day.

    And none of this is as high as the conditions in MIL-STD-2169, the standard for EMP, which is classified.

    ak
     
  20. Sree

    Sree

    17
    0
    Dec 11, 2015
    Dear ak
    I am a hobbyist in electronics. So I do not have fully understood your diagram. Please reply me to clarify my doubts please......(I marked it in red in the attached diagram)

    1. I think the +12V you meant, it is from the battery +ve directly. Is it?
    2. I think the 'Earthing' you meant, it is from the battery -ve directly. Is it?
    3. 'Blinker power' means? (From/to the connection leads to?)
    4. 'Blinker input' means? (From/to the connection leads to?)
    5. 'Earthing' (in the red middle circle) means? (From/to the connection leads to?)
    6. How the circuit from the '11' from IC? (Using the transistor)

    hope your reply
     

    Attached Files:

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