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Default Wiring Multiple Lamps in Parallel to the Mains

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by icecapsule, May 2, 2013.

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  1. icecapsule

    icecapsule

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    May 2, 2013
    Hi, I want to wire quite a lot of lamps in parallel and I was wondering how many could I have in one set? Also, ideally I'd like it to go to the mains due to the volume.

    So, I want to wire as many of these as possible; http://www.lampspecs.co.uk/Light-Bul...625MA-1-5W-E10

    Much like fairy lights I suppose, but they have to be these bulbs :)

    So far I've found that it's best to have a parallel circuit (though it is possible to have a parallel and series circuit combined I see). I've seen forum sites say I could have 10 X 20W bulbs in parallel safely, though could I have more than 10 in a sequence with these bulbs?

    What sort of cable would I use to wire these bulbs together? Would it be the regular 2 core flex? Or something else? I've also heard of some people using a terminal strip to connect it all together, is this advised? Or should I wire them without this?

    Lots of questions!

    Thanks,

    Claire
     
  2. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    May 8, 2012
    I'm assuming that you're located in the UK. These LED lamps are rated at 12 Watts each. That computes to 55mA at 220V. They're not designed to be wired in series. To find your total current multiply .055 x the number of bulbs. Your breaker size, wire size and type must meet your local electrical and fire codes.

    Chris
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2013
  3. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Your link is broken, so I can't comment on the specific devices.

    If they are rated for your local mains voltage then you can string as many of them in parallel as you like up to the point that you hit the limit for the load on the circuit you're using.

    Assuming we're talking around 10A, that would mean you need to use wiring rated for 10A -- well at least up to the first bulb, it drops from there, but you would be sensible to use the same cable throughout.

    If your bulbs require less than your mains voltage you may be able to connect them in series to form strings, then in parallel for many strings of them. Each string takes the current that a single bulb requires. Then this is multiplied by the number of strings (you'll note that this is true of bulbs placed in parallel too -- simply assume the string is 1 bulb long)

    My mains voltage is 240V and the max current for a power circuit is 10A (I think it's 8A for a light circuit). So I can connect up to 2400W of lighting to a power circuit. For your 20W bulbs... I could connect 120 of them.

    Be aware that connecting things to the mains is dangerous (as in, it can kill you very easily!). From your questions it is clear you have little or no experience. It may be best not to try this sort of project without some knowledgeable assistance.
     
  4. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    Was I looking at the wrong bulb? I was commenting on the 12W LED bulb prominently featured on that page!

    Chris
     
  5. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Possibly.

    The link is broken and you just get their home page. From the look of part of that link it mentions 5W and 625 ma, so it seems to be an 8 volt lamp of some sort.
     
  6. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    Oops!

    Chris
     
  7. icecapsule

    icecapsule

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    May 2, 2013
    You're right I'm n the UK.

    O, sorry about that! The details of the lamp from the link are;

    Panel Lamps 15x29mm E10
    15mm x 29mm 2.4V 625MA 1.5W E10

    There are lots of other ones in this range that would also be suitable that go from 2.4V (this ones the lowest) to 60V, with the MA and W changing accordingly.

    I work at an art college so I was hoping I could wire it up and take it in for the electrician to overview before I actually go to use it. (They're more willing to help you that way, rather than actually directing you 'how to do' something).

    Another option is I could ask an electrician to make it for me, I would pay them of course. Though in my experience as soon as I mention that I'm an artist I'm like a hot coal and they just drop the idea of taking on the project.

    Thanks!
     
  8. BobK

    BobK

    7,682
    1,688
    Jan 5, 2010
    You would want 100 of those in series to connect to the mains. And each time one went out...

    Use a transformer to lower the voltage and place them in parallel. Is there any specific reason you have chosen the lowest voltage one?

    Bob
     
  9. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    May 8, 2012
    All of what Bob said plus there's still no direct link to this item.

    Chris
     
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