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dead motherboards...

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Papcina, May 19, 2007.

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  1. Papcina

    Papcina Guest

    hi people..

    im interested in repairing computers motherboards.. mostly the older
    ones ( based around socket 370, socket A and lower) and have some
    questions... when there is a motherboard fried from a power surge, is
    it worth trying repairing? what components usually die in such
    situations? how to check all those SMD componentes and small ICs on
    easiest way to find out if they work or no?

    well, any info about such problems is needed... thanks in advance

    bye
     
  2. PeterD

    PeterD Guest

    Never. There are zillions of these out there you can get for free, so
    why try to fix one?
     
  3. w9gb

    w9gb Guest

  4. Papcina

    Papcina Guest

    Bilo je to Sat, 19 May 2007 08:56:29 -0500, kada je poznati "w9gb"
    yes ano about the capacitors... but what when a mobo gives no sign of
    being alive? the capacitors r fine, bios is reflashed and no visible
    sign of burnt stuff? how to find an error in that case?
    FETs works normally, every other bigger chip is wroking fine...

    any ideas where to check more?

    im sentimentaly affected to this mbo :))
     
  5. Jim Yanik

    Jim Yanik Guest

    WHERE does one get these FREE motherboards?
     
  6. w9gb

    w9gb Guest

    Most computer motherboards are 4 layer and many are 6 layer -- so problems
    may be present you can not see (but testing would --- takes time -- to find
    bad component,etc.) START with Power Bus and go from there.
     
  7. GPE

    GPE Guest



    For computers that old, check businesses that are doing tech refreshes.
    Many of them -pay- to have their computers hauled away. And many of the
    computers aren't that old.
     
  8. Jeroni Paul

    Jeroni Paul Guest

    Check the RAM. Those old DIMM slots suffer frequently from bent pins.
    Also try another RAM stick (DIMMS must be in pairs).
    Then try to replace the CPU, supply and video card.
     
  9. Jerry G.

    Jerry G. Guest

    You will find that the economics of repairing old mother boards does not
    make sense. The devices are all surface mounted, and the troubleshooting
    and servicing requires extensive knowledge, sophisticated tools and
    sophisticated equipment. Then there will be the problem if finding the
    replacement parts.

    You are best off to look around for older computers and rebuild them.
    But, having older computers will be limited in their capability,
    especially with the newer operating systems and software's. This is why
    they are going to the landfills in the first place!

    I think you should seriously look for something that is more profitable.
    If fixing old computers was profitable, there would be many more
    companies doing it!

    --

    Jerry G.


    hi people..

    im interested in repairing computers motherboards.. mostly the older
    ones ( based around socket 370, socket A and lower) and have some
    questions... when there is a motherboard fried from a power surge, is
    it worth trying repairing? what components usually die in such
    situations? how to check all those SMD componentes and small ICs on
    easiest way to find out if they work or no?

    well, any info about such problems is needed... thanks in advance

    bye
     
  10. Papcina

    Papcina Guest

    Bilo je to Sat, 19 May 2007 15:53:44 -0400, kada je poznati "Jerry G."
    xD lol... well in fact i dont want to get in bussines with nothing,
    its just i have some old motherboards with no sign of life, which i
    would like to repair... and a wonderful cubx mbo :))

    thx for answers

    bb
     
  11. PeterD

    PeterD Guest

    MOst any independent computer repair shop will do. THey frequently
    have to pay to dispose of them, and are glad to give them away. Many
    are the result of upgrades. The local shop generates a couple of them
    a week, sometimes more. THey usualy have a pile of 20 or so in the
    scrap pile at any time.
     
  12. Andy Cuffe

    Andy Cuffe Guest


    I've fixed a lot of dead motherboards by removing the CMOS battery for
    a day or two. This has worked several times, even when the clear CMOS
    jumper didn't help.
    Andy Cuffe

     
  13. Papcina

    Papcina Guest

    Bilo je to Sat, 19 May 2007 19:08:33 -0400, kada je poznati PeterD

    it could be, but not in all countries over the world :(
     
  14. DaveM

    DaveM Guest

    If a motherboard is showing no signs of life, how can you say that every other
    bigger chip is working fine? If the board is dead, meaning that it won't boot
    up, or even run POST tests, then how are you checking the "bigger chips?
    You can't assume anything in this case... everything has to be verified
    conclusively. The only way that I can think of doing that in the case of a dead
    motherboard is to unsolder the chips and put them on a known good board. Given
    the lack of service information on any of the PC boards that have been produced
    in the past 25 years, it's shooting in the dark.

    --
    Dave M
    MasonDG44 at comcast dot net (Just substitute the appropriate characters in the
    address)

    Life is like a roll of toilet paper; the closer to the end, the faster it goes.
     
  15. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest


    I gave away a pile of them on Craigslist, I probably have some more laying
    around I need to dump off on there.
     
  16. Andy Cuffe

    Andy Cuffe Guest

    There's no way to know. Fortunately, the big chips are very reliable.
    They don't normally fail unless something really bad happened (like
    excessive voltage from a bad power supply, or someone shorting
    something out). Testing the chips is completely impractical. The
    soldering equipment alone would cost thousands.

    The way to trouble shoot a motherboard is to eliminate the few things
    you can fix before scrapping the board. Once you eliminate the simple
    stuff, it doesn't really matter whether it's a bad chipset chip, bad
    internal connection on the board, or some other unfixable problem.

    I've repaired a lot of boards by replacing exploded caps. I've also
    replaced melted ATX power connectors. On one board, I even replaced
    some bad voltage regulator transistors (they were over heated because
    of bad caps). If you know the board suffered from a failed BIOS
    flash, you can reprogram the flash chip (it helps if it's in a
    socket).
    Andy Cuffe

     
  17. Gary Tait

    Gary Tait Guest

    Around here, it is not worth upgrading the innards of older computes, as
    they don't meet modern power and cooling requiremnts, and the cases don't
    "match" modern fashions, so old PCs are thrown out whole, and new ones
    bought.
     
  18. ---> as they don't meet modern power and cooling requiremnts, and
    ---> the cases don't "match" modern fashions,
    If we are asked, in the year 2525, what we did with all energy,
    then we can gladly answer: We built things and dumped them.

    (SCNR) Regards,
    H.
     
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