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DC Wave Questions

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by [email protected], Jun 10, 2005.

  1. Well, that's ok. To say "there is a capacitance in the circuit", would
    mean that there is the property of capacitance, irrespective of whether
    or not there was an explicit capacitor present.

    Kevin Aylward

    http://www.anasoft.co.uk
    SuperSpice, a very affordable Mixed-Mode
    Windows Simulator with Schematic Capture,
    Waveform Display, FFT's and Filter Design.
     
  2. Well, I suppose I will have to qualify that with "those that really know
    what they are doing"

    Its so obvious to pros that inductors might well saturate, that they
    simply wont address that issue when responding to basic electrical
    questions on AC and DC analysis. You can't qualify everything one says.
    One has to assume something to avoid reams of verbiage.

    Kevin Aylward

    http://www.anasoft.co.uk
    SuperSpice, a very affordable Mixed-Mode
    Windows Simulator with Schematic Capture,
    Waveform Display, FFT's and Filter Design.
     
  3. Tom Grayson

    Tom Grayson Guest

    Hey JackBruce
    I got fed up with the crap the other posters wrote about your terminology,
    and did not really see if anyone actually answered your question, Which, by
    the way, Was very easy to understand. Ignore the other jackasses here, that
    nitpick. They have too much time on their hands, i can see.

    Question 1
    The impedance of inductors and reactors is based on the varying signal
    frequency, Weather it is offset by the DC component or not.
    This answer assumes that you are not reaching the current limit of any of
    the devices, naturally if the DC Current in the "L" Device saturates the
    Flux medium ( air or iron) then you will get non linearities introduced,
    Not sure what the limit on a "C" Device would be, probably current again.

    Question 2
    The link didn't work but most of the modern devices looking for peaks and
    valleys work fine with a DC Offset.

    Tom Grayson
     
  4. Danny

    Danny Guest

    I've just noticed this 'long' thread. It is of interest to me as I had
    a not dissimilar problem. The use of superposition is absolutely
    correct in a linear system where the system component values do not
    vary with the signal applies. However, when applying the ac component
    the skin effect phenomenon will deplete the current carrying carriers
    from the centre of the conductive component thus reducing the effective
    cross sectional area......which will also effect the dc
    resistance....or will it?

    Danny
     
  5. Reg Edwards

    Reg Edwards Guest

    ========================================

    No, it won't. However, it does appear have affected superposition of
    your thinking processes. ;o)
     
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest

    It will not. Each frequency component will work independently of others.
    The modification of resistance by heating is a nonlinear effect that will
    couple different frequencies.

    Bill
     
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