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DC power to small AC motor?

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Sepp Spenlinhauer, Oct 20, 2004.

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  1. Hi - I am hoping someone can help me....

    I have some small "Christmas light turners" (the kind you replace a light in
    your Christmas light set with and it spins your ornaments on the tree)
    I am trying to drive those motors from a DC power source (batteries) as part
    of a mobile display.
    I only need about 3 volts AC (not sure of the current - can't be much)

    I have looked a LOTS of DC/AC inverter circuits but they are all designed
    for 110volts.

    ANY help here is really appreciated - I am getting down to the wire on
    finishing this project.

    Thanks SEPP!
     
  2. peterken

    peterken Guest

    Try building a circuit generating a square wave of say 5V-50Hz and use a
    small 1:1 transformer or a (big enough) coupling capacitor
    For low energy I'd try the latter
    For a simple 1:1 transformer you might use an 'off the shelf transformer'
    having 2 identical 6V "outputs", use one as input and the other as output,
    thus ignoring the 110/220V connections


    Hi - I am hoping someone can help me....

    I have some small "Christmas light turners" (the kind you replace a light in
    your Christmas light set with and it spins your ornaments on the tree)
    I am trying to drive those motors from a DC power source (batteries) as part
    of a mobile display.
    I only need about 3 volts AC (not sure of the current - can't be much)

    I have looked a LOTS of DC/AC inverter circuits but they are all designed
    for 110volts.

    ANY help here is really appreciated - I am getting down to the wire on
    finishing this project.

    Thanks SEPP!
     
  3. Sounds like a good idea - Do you know where I can find a schematic or parts
    list to do that?

    Thanks SEPP!
     
  4. Tam/WB2TT

    Tam/WB2TT Guest

    Sepp,
    First I would make sure that the motor won't run on DC. If not, the simplest
    thing is to get the 110VAC inverter, and a 6.0 or 6.3 v CENTER TAPPED
    filament transformer (1 amp transformer should be more than enough). Connect
    the motor between the center tap and either one of the other output leads.

    Tam

    Tam
     
  5. peterken

    peterken Guest

    My answer before was of course inspired by reading you are using a battery,
    so a DC supply
    Otherwise you *might* consider using the transformer Tam suggests, it's alot
    simpler of course

    To build a 50/60Hz oscillator you might just use a simple 555 integrated
    timer, schematics are all over to find
    Output current *might* be enough for driving directly what you want

    IF using the suggested 1:1 transformer *DON'T* forget clamping diodes,
    otherwise you might damage the 555 due to voltage spikes

    good luck


    Sounds like a good idea - Do you know where I can find a schematic or parts
    list to do that?

    Thanks SEPP!
     
  6. Kim Clay

    Kim Clay Guest

    Try a 555 timer operated around 50% duty running on 5VDC or so.
    See: http://www.uoguelph.ca/~antoon/circ/555dcac.html

    For a ~3VAC output drive the 555 from 4.5V to 6V DC.
    The typical 555 is rated for a 200mA Max output drive.

    For a </=100mA load (maybe a single motor?) forget the whole output
    circuit connected to pin 3. Just connect a 1000 to 4700uF cap to pin 3
    (cap pos(+) to pin 3) & connect the load from the other end of the cap
    to ground.

    For maybe 500mA or better use the 2 transistor drive in the drawing &
    connect your load in place of L1/T1 (connect motor from the output cap
    negative to ground). Depending on the current needed by the motor you
    may be able to drive 2 or more motors with this arrangement.

    The output capacitor needs to be larger with larger loads.
    1000uF= 2.65 ohms at 60Hz, 3.18 ohms at 50Hz
    2200uF= 1.2 ohms at 60Hz, 1.45 ohms at 50Hz
    4700uF= 0.56 ohms at 60Hz, 0.68 ohms at 50Hz
    10000uF= 0.26 ohms at 60Hz, 0.32 ohms at 50Hz

    For a rather nice tutorial on the 555 visit:
    http://www.uoguelph.ca/~antoon/gadgets/555/555.html

    Experiment a little with the 555 supply voltage & its output capacitor.
    In this circuit R4 changes the frequency from ~69Hz (R4= 0 ohms) to
    ~47Hz (R4= 50K).

    Happy Holidays - Kim Clay
     
  7. Joerg

    Joerg Guest

    Hi Sepp,

    You could build a simple blocked oscillator using an old transformer
    core. To see how that is done check National's AN-288. Has to be 60Hz
    though, not the high frequency they suggest. If you can find an old
    transformer with enough symmetrical taps you may not even have to wind
    anything.

    Other than that, even a 74HC chip as an oscillator could work. They'll
    go down to 3V easily and you can parallel gates for more power as long
    as they are all in the same package. If it all hums or buzzes too much
    you might need some low pass filtering so that the familiy rendition of
    Silent Night is not disturbed by noises.

    Regards, Joerg
     
  8. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    If there's not some kind of control circuitry involved, and if you've
    verified that it's 3VAC, it's probably 60Hz from the line. That is,
    if there isn't some kind of electronic speed control. If that is the
    case, then just get a 6VCT transformer at Radio Schlock and use half
    the winding, and you're done. ;-)

    Cheers!
    Rich
     
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