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DC power supply

Discussion in 'Power Electronics' started by vick5821, Mar 24, 2012.

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  1. vick5821

    vick5821

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    Jan 22, 2012
    Hey there, any creative ideas on how to make a DC power supply special than others ? This is one of my coursework.

    Thank you
     
  2. timothy48342

    timothy48342

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    Nov 28, 2011
    I think if the DCV was dialable over a range or over multiple ranges,that would be useful.

    Or perhaps a range selector where you can choose some standard values, like 3.3V, 5V, 12V, 18V, 24V, etc. And then a fine tuning dial to make up for imperfect resistors or load. A built in display showing the current voltage, maybe.

    Something that controls source resistance, too. (with or without a meter) You would set the source resistance higher under most circumstances to protect circuits that your testing and only dial it down to provide more power when you are sure it is nessesary.

    Something that also shows the power consumption in watts at any given moment would be a nice feature.

    To keep it much simpler, maybe just add one of those 3 meters. Maybe not connected all the time, but with a button to be pressed for activation. For instance, you press a button to see how much current your circuit is drawing at the moment.

    How involved of a project is it supposed to be? What level of study are you at?

    --tim
     
  3. vick5821

    vick5821

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    Jan 22, 2012
    I at at undegraduate level. The project is for my basic lab :) I am just first year in EE
     
  4. cjdelphi

    cjdelphi

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    Oct 26, 2011
    you want to make DC more 'special' than others... 12vdc vs 12vdc special?... give it a card saying how special you are?
     
  5. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    The 2 essentials for a basic lab PSU are continuously variable Voltage, NOT a selector switch for Voltage. The other is adjustable current and preferably with current limiting so as to protect your circuits under test....
    I dread to think how often I would have cooked experiments if my PSU didn't have current limiting !!!

    Cheers
    Dave
     
  6. vick5821

    vick5821

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    Jan 22, 2012
    Not sating DC special..I meean In terms of design :p
     
  7. cjdelphi

    cjdelphi

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    Oct 26, 2011
    People always oooo and arrrrrrr over anything that shows numbers and stuff, buy a Digital Ammeter / Volt Meter wire them up and people will think it's special lol
     
  8. OLIVE2222

    OLIVE2222

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    Oct 2, 2011
    Hi, maybe a system ensuring that the suply start at 0V at power up can be a nice feature.

    Olivier
     
  9. vick5821

    vick5821

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    Jan 22, 2012
    Means ?
     
  10. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Maybe you can look at what's going on at http://eevblog.com where Dave is designing a power supply.

    Part 1 is here. It may give you some things to think about.
     
  11. vick5821

    vick5821

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    Jan 22, 2012
    Thank you
     
  12. OLIVE2222

    OLIVE2222

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    Oct 2, 2011
    Hi, I mean avoiding to have a voltage setted when powering the supply up whatever the potentiometer position will be. The aim is to avoid burning things because of over voltage.

    Olivier
     
  13. KJ6EAD

    KJ6EAD

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    Aug 13, 2011
    I like Dave's design on the EEVblog but I've always wanted an adjustable lab power supply that had three big bright LED displays; blue for voltage, red for current and emerald green for current limit setpoint which would turn amber whenever the limiter was activated by the load.
     
  14. Shyamal796

    Shyamal796

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    Mar 19, 2012
    Do you need regulated power supply?
     
  15. vick5821

    vick5821

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    Jan 22, 2012
    Would be better :)
     
  16. War_Spigot

    War_Spigot

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    Feb 20, 2012
    I believe some power supplies have an initial voltage spike on startup.
     
  17. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

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    Nov 28, 2011
    If you're keen you could design a power supply with a switching pre-regulator and a linear post-regulator to get the best combination of efficiency with load transient response. This has been done before BTW. When your output is, say, 12V, have the switching regulator drop the unreg rail (40~60V or so) down to say 16V, with bulk smoothing, and have the linear regulator drop that to 12V. If the load changes suddenly, the linear regulator can handle it, because of the bulk smoothing on its input. The switching regulator doesn't respond quickly to load transients but with this arrangement it doesn't need to. This gives good efficiency and good output current over a good range of output voltages.
    I also like the idea of multiple output meters, including output power.
    And yes of course you would want adjustable current limiting.
     
  18. jackorocko

    jackorocko

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    Apr 4, 2010
    I would also recommend steve and KJ's option. The over exuberant dave at EEVblog is building a very nice lab PSU. You could even incorporate Olivers idea in if you use the PWM option that dave speaks about in part 4 of the video series by using a uC.
     
  19. Shyamal796

    Shyamal796

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    Mar 19, 2012
    In which work you need this special kind of power supply?
     
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