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DC Power Splitter

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Martyn Ball, Jan 2, 2016.

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  1. Martyn Ball

    Martyn Ball

    13
    1
    Jan 2, 2016
    Hey, I want to integrate some DC Outputs into my desk (to connect LED lights ect) but not sure how to do it. I know there are splitters I can buy, but most are pricey and not really what i'm after.

    Just wondering if someone could post a diagram of how I would wire something like this together, for example what power limiters I would need ect and what would I use to convert the 240V from the wall down to 12V and 9V outputs?

    I would also like to integrate a fader for 1 or 2 outputs so I can use it to DIM some LED's. On the photo you can see what I mean, I want some outputs in the desk like that (maybe not in the location but you get the picture). I just need to know how to wire these up and what electronics I would need to use. I would like some LED's to light up next to the output when a device is plugged in as well.

    I have attached one of the devices you can buy, which is similar to what I want but in my desk

    P.S. I don't really know too much about electronics terminology, so bear that in mind :D

    Thanks!
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 3, 2016
  2. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

    3,492
    944
    May 12, 2015
    Hi Martyn,
    First of all, you dont use "power limiters" to reduce voltage.
    Second, you shouldn't play with mains voltage, otherwise it could 'limit' your time on earth...
    Third, you need a transformer to convert 240v to 12v and 9v.
    Then after that has been sorted, you can use pwm circuits to dim the LEDs.
    Check Ebay for LED drivers.

    Martin
     
  3. dorke

    dorke

    2,342
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    Jun 20, 2015
    As simple as it gets:
    1.Use a wall-wart(5,6,9,12VDC any may do the trick) they aren't expansive and you probably have more than one laying around.
    What kind of LED-lights?
     
    Martaine2005 likes this.
  4. Martyn Ball

    Martyn Ball

    13
    1
    Jan 2, 2016
    Like I said, wasn't too sure on the terminology aha. "otherwise it could limit your time on earth" - that did make me laugh!

    But thanks for that information!
     
    Martaine2005 likes this.
  5. Martyn Ball

    Martyn Ball

    13
    1
    Jan 2, 2016
    Okay thanks, and im guessing your asking what kind I would be plugging in to the outputs? Mainly Strip's of LED lights you find under cupboards, but I want the outputs there to power anything really. Thinking about it, I might buy the product I posted a photo of in the OP, attach that to my desk, and then just integrate LED's drivers into the desk, that will make things simpler.
     
  6. Osmium

    Osmium

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    17
    Jan 28, 2013
    Firstly, let's make a distinction between Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) as an electronic component and LED lights which are "complete" lighting units ready to be plugged into a power source. You, I think (correct me if I'm wrong) , are interested in the second - the complete LED lights ready to be plugged into a power source. LEDs as components can't just be plugged into a power source.

    OK. So we're talking about LED lights. They come in myriad forms designed to be powered from different power sources. The "power splitter" you've indicated supplies 9v and 12v from an 18v power source so, let's say you are interested in either 9v led strips or 12v led strips or both. As well as the supply voltage (9v or 12v), LED light strips require a minimum current rating for their power source. This is typically 500mA (milliamps) to as high as 1 or 2 amps. The "power splitter" that you have shown is only capable of providing 100mA for each output. This is not sufficient to power a LED light strip. IE: Don't buy it if you expect it to power LED light strips - it won't work.

    The multiple wall-wart idea from dorke would seem to be a great solution. You are going to hide the the power unit(s) in the desk anyway so they won't be visible. I would suggest figuring out the LED light types you are actually going to use and then choose the wall-warts that are capable of powering them. Personally I'd go for 12v 1A units since you are likely to find most LED lights at this voltage.
     
  7. Osmium

    Osmium

    67
    17
    Jan 28, 2013
    Addendum: There are short LED light strips which can be powered from low current power sources (<100mA) If this is what you are after then you CAN use the splitter for these. You need to check the requirements of your lights.

    Also, you could provide several switched outputs from a single higher power (2A say) supply. Looks like separate outputs but is really only switched from the same supply.
     
  8. Martyn Ball

    Martyn Ball

    13
    1
    Jan 2, 2016
    Thanks for that information, to be honest I will probably only power LED Strip lights[1], description says "Power Consumption (W/m): 5.76W/m". Never been to sure on this, but how would I workout how much power it would need per meter of the LED's, as I might connect a load together to go around a full room, or would an LED Driver draw as much power as needed?

    [1] http://www.aliexpress.com/item/Cool...00-Leds-60LED-M-Green-Blue-Red/641938364.html
     
  9. dorke

    dorke

    2,342
    665
    Jun 20, 2015
    You read this correctly.
    The 5 metre strip will consume 5*5.76W=29Watts.
    It will require a 12V/2.5A wall wart.
    Get a SMPS type so it will not be very bulky and warm.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 3, 2016
  10. Osmium

    Osmium

    67
    17
    Jan 28, 2013
    dorke beat me to it... but you get the idea. For the purposes of this discussion you can use the equation Watts = Volts x Amps or put another way Amps = Watts/Volts. So for 10 meters at 5.76 Watts per metre gives 57.6 Watts. Then Required power supply current capability (Amps) = 57.6/12 = 4.8 Amps. Round it up to 5 Amps. It might be better/cheaper to use several 2.5 Amp wall warts, one for each 5 metre section, rather than getting one large unit to try and power the lot.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 3, 2016
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