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DC-DC Buck Converter

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by stewart, Mar 18, 2016.

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  1. stewart

    stewart

    6
    1
    Mar 18, 2016
    Hi
    I am doing a project that needs to step voltage from a 36 V battery to 5 V to 3 loads.
    if each load needs 5 V and roughly the same amount of current of 2 A.
    then can I buy a buck converter that out puts 5V 2A to supply 3 loads in parallel each needing 2 A or will i burn my buck converter?
    plz plz plz help
     
  2. Gryd3

    Gryd3

    4,098
    875
    Jun 25, 2014
    Where in the world did you find a 36V battery?
    Simply find a 5V Buck Converter rated for 6A at the bare minimum.
    What are the loads? If it's a heavy inductive load, then you could fry if you don't have proper protection on the motors.
     
  3. stewart

    stewart

    6
    1
    Mar 18, 2016
    the battery i am tapping into is that one that came with my electric ATV, thought would be a good idea not to get an external battery.
    loads are raspberry pi or arduino still didnt decide, ultrasonic sensor and a servo motor
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 22, 2016
  4. Gryd3

    Gryd3

    4,098
    875
    Jun 25, 2014
    Arduino takes 2A ?!
    You'll be fine. If you will be connecting it to a large motor for example, or large servo, make sure you use a diode to prevent the motor from feeding back into the circuit.
     
  5. stewart

    stewart

    6
    1
    Mar 18, 2016
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2016
  6. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,765
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    Sep 5, 2009
    it will supply the current required by the load
     
  7. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

    2,458
    705
    Jun 10, 2015
    Don't know about burning up, but it might shut down due to an overcurrent.

    To answer your question, when multiple loads are connected in parallel their load currents sum, or add up. So three 2-amp loads need a 6-amp source. Depending on the nature of the loads, they might draw 2 A continuously but draw more (or much more) at startup. Your DC/DC converter needs to be able to handle the transient startup current, not just the running current.

    ak
     
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