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Current Measurement Rating

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Navivanuva, Jul 9, 2015.

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  1. Navivanuva

    Navivanuva

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    Mar 3, 2013
    Hi, newbie here.

    I have a multimeter (Sanwa CD771). It has max current measurement of 10A at 1000V. In my understanding, it means that i can measure up to 10000 watt. If thats true, does it mean that I can measure current higher than 10A at lower voltage? Lets say, 12v at 20A. Please enlight me masters :D. Thanks
     
  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    no .... 10A is the max ( well it is for most general multimeters)
     
  3. Navivanuva

    Navivanuva

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    Mar 3, 2013
    Thanks for the quick reply. Would u mind explaining why? :D
     
  4. Colin Mitchell

    Colin Mitchell

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    Aug 31, 2014
    1. Because the wire inside the meter will get too hot if more than 10 amps flows.
    2. Because the program inside the meter may only be designed to read up to 10 amp.
    But you can try 12 amps and see if the reading is 12
     
  5. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    Plus there is probably a fuse that will blow at currents >10A.

    The misunderstanding comes from a wrong interpretation of the meter's ratings. If can measure either up to 10A or up to 1000V. But not both simultaneously.
    At 10A, there will be a very small voltage drop (a few hundred millivolt) to avoid overloading the meter and to minimize the influence of the meter's voltage drop on the circuit being measured.
    At 1000V there will be a very small current (a few µA), again to avoid overloading the meter and to minimize the influence of the meter's current consumprion on the circuit being measured.
     
  6. Colin Mitchell

    Colin Mitchell

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    Aug 31, 2014
    "The misunderstanding comes from a wrong interpretation of the meter's ratings. If can measure either up to 10A or up to 1000V. But not both simultaneously."
    NO.
    Basically the meter has insulated leads and you can measure either AC or DC up to 10 amp on a 1,000 volt line.
    "At 1000V there will be a very small current (a few µA), "

    At 1V there will also be a very small current (a few µA).
     
  7. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    Yes, you can, but you still measure either current or voltage, not both simultaneously.
     
  8. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

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    May 12, 2015
    I personally wouldn't put that meter anywhere near 10A or 1000v.
    the meter is cat111 600v. I would guess that's it's absolute maximum.
    And only just got cat 111 by the skin of it's teeth.

    youtube has many videos testing meters and Fluke tested 100's of Japanese meters. They all blew to pieces and caught fire.

    If you want to play with high voltage and high amps, buy a dedicated tester.
    And use your multimeter for home projects only.

    Martin
     
    Harald Kapp and davenn like this.
  9. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    agreed Martin !!
    a very wise response :)
     
  10. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Jun 10, 2015
    You are combining two different specifications of the meter incorrectly. The 10 A rating is the maximum current the meter can sense without damage when acting as a current meter. The 1000V rating is the maximum voltage the meter can sense without damage when acting as a volt meter. The meter can be in one measurement mode or the other, never both at the same time; it cannot measure both things at once - that would be a power meter, a very different device.

    ak
     
  11. cjdelphi

    cjdelphi

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    Oct 26, 2011
    Current is what causes the fuse to blow, simply heat melts the fuse... for example to blow a 1amp fuse, you could use 1 aa battery and short it and blow it...

    but you could equally use 1000v but only 1ma and while very deadly, that fuse should not blow...

    amps x volts = watts

    Total power is measured in watts
     
  12. Minder

    Minder

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    Apr 24, 2015
    For my Fluke multi-meter I use the AC/DC Clamp on ammeter accessory, high range and no exposure to high voltage.
    M.
     
  13. cjdelphi

    cjdelphi

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    Oct 26, 2011
    I bet a lot of "experienced" electronics guys have been hit with high voltage a few times in their life :)
     
  14. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

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    May 12, 2015
    <<------- And 'inexperienced' :eek:
     
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