Connect with us

current draw from a small apartment stove?

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Sam Kaan, Jan 25, 2004.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. Sam Kaan

    Sam Kaan Guest

    I wonder if anyone know the current draw from a small apartment's
    stove?
    This is the type of stove that only has 2 heating elements instead of
    the 4 in the house-size stove.

    Of course it also has the oven element inside also.

    So what would be the overall amperage draw and the individual ones
    (each element).

    PS: What would happens if you try to control the heat level using one
    of those motor speed control. Theese units plug into the wall outlet
    and offer AC plug coming out of it which is controlled by a variable
    resistor of some kind. Provided it meets the current draw of course.
     
  2. I read in sci.electronics.design that Sam Kaan <>
    Either the current or the power should be marked on a rating label,
    which may be on the back of the stove. If the power is given, divide by
    120 or 240, depending on which voltage the stove operates on, to get the
    current.

    No, do not try to use a motor speed controller. It might appear to work
    but you have no way of knowing that it is safe and a big fire could
    result.
     
  3. Tim Shoppa

    Tim Shoppa Guest

    For a "house size" stove with oven, there's a 50 or 60 Amp breaker and 240V
    wiring.

    Yours is probably half the size, maybe 20 Amps at 240V, or 50 Amps at
    120V.
    Big mistake, IMHO. The oven has a thermostat and the top elements have
    their own power control. If either is defective, repair it with the
    proper parts. The stove/oven is almost certainly hardwired in and
    there's no plug or jack until you start cutting wires and hacking it
    up, not something you're allowed to do. The NEC and local fire codes
    will offer more details.

    Tim.
     
  4. N. Thornton

    N. Thornton Guest


    Its impossible to rate it without seeing, but here ovens like that on
    13A plugs are fairly common. Oven is 1 to 1.5kW, the rings are 1kW
    each, and one of the rings is arranged so that when the oven element
    comes on that one ring is simultaneoulsy switched off. This keeps the
    whole lot at under 13A, making it a plug in item.


    Regards, NT
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-