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Crimp, Bullet, Shur connector: TE Connectivity

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Andy Leese, May 29, 2018.

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  1. Andy Leese

    Andy Leese

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    May 29, 2018
    Firstly, please forgive my lack of understanding in regard to my question.

    I am looking for a crimp tool for the connector: TE Connectivity Uninsulated Male Crimp Bullet Connector, 0.5mm² to 2.27mm², 20AWG to 14AWG, 4mm Bullet diameter. I have a number of these connectors to crimp, they have a part that crimps onto the bare wire and a seperate part that crimps onto the cable. I don't really know exactly what they are called... shur plugs, Amp plugs, uninsulated bullet plugs, etc.

    This is the website from which they were bought: https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/crimp-bullet-connectors/7121545/

    I was told to use the Double Action Hand Tool, Part Number: 2088544-1. I understand why this item is so expensive, but at over £900 / $1200, I,m looking for a cheap alternative. Can anybody offer any solutions or advice. What exactly should I be looking for?

    Many thanks
     

    Attached Files:

  2. KJ6EAD

    KJ6EAD

    1,114
    159
    Aug 13, 2011
    Those require an open barrel crimp known as an F crimp. There are several ratcheting crimp frames made by Greenlee that will accept open barrel crimp dies. The combination of a Greenlee PA8000 frame and 10877 die runs around $100. Molex makes a non-ratcheting universal F crimp tool that goes for about $50. The ratcheting crimper is easier and faster to use but the dies don't allow for a wide variation between conductor crimp and insulation crimp sizes as they're done simultaneously. With the universal crimper you can determine experimentally which well is best for each (conductor and insulation).

    Greenlee PA8027

    Molex 63811-1000
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2018
    Andy Leese likes this.
  3. Andy Leese

    Andy Leese

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    May 29, 2018
    Thank you for the help. It is very much appreciated. I have just ordered the Molex tool you suggested. Thank you again.
     
  4. Andy Leese

    Andy Leese

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    0
    May 29, 2018
    KJ6EAD, is it a case of trial and error which crimp size on the tool to use for these F crimp connectors or is there a more scientific approach in regard to cable thickness, connector diameter or some such? Thanks in advance.
     
  5. KJ6EAD

    KJ6EAD

    1,114
    159
    Aug 13, 2011
    It's trial and examine for proper form and pullout strength on the conductor crimp. The bottom of the die on the tool is curved in a larger radius than your connector would like so you need to select a well that the connector fits into but wedges above the bottom. The connector will be forced down and partially flattened when crimped. The insulation crimp is less critical. The images below show the basic form of a completed F crimp.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Open barrel connectors are made for a specific range of wire and insulation diameter. If you have a mismatch, the wrap wings will be too long or too short, the crimp will be misshapen or broken and/or the wire will not be held securely. Now you see why the "right" tool costs so much.

    When you've found the optimal wells for conductor and insulation, mark them with small tape arrows or removeable paint dots until all crimps are completed.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2018
  6. Andy Leese

    Andy Leese

    4
    0
    May 29, 2018
    When you say "The bottom of the die on the tool is curved in a larger radius than your connector would like..." what exactly do you mean? Do you mean the Molex tool is too big? Is this because this tool isn't the "right" tool, whereas the TE 2088544-1 tool is a perfect fit. If this is the case I presume the size difference is negligible? Many thanks
     
  7. KJ6EAD

    KJ6EAD

    1,114
    159
    Aug 13, 2011
    The connector profile is round. The base or bottom die is curved but not as curved as the connector. While it's a given that the crimping operation changes the shape of the top part of the connector; most notably the wings or ears are curled and compressed, it's also true that the bottom of the connector will be somewhat flattened in a non-ideal tool whereas an ideal tool would deform the bottom of the connector less. This is the kind of compromise you make when asking for far less expensive, but serviceable tooling. I have in the past purchased inexpensive dies ($20) for the ratcheting crimpers then ground and polished them to modify the profile to what I needed.

    P.S. Since your connectors don't have a flat or semi-flat bottom, you'll need to hold them as securely as possible to prevent rotation during the beginning of the crimping process.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2018
    Andy Leese likes this.
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