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Creating a 9VDC adaptor for my multimeter.

Discussion in 'Power Electronics' started by Yonut27, Jun 3, 2021.

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  1. Yonut27

    Yonut27

    6
    0
    Jun 3, 2021
    Hi,

    I had taken an electronics common core course about 13 years ago. Lately, I have been wanting to get back into learning, as I have some free time due to the "planned-demic".

    Anyway, over the years, I have needed to replace my 9V battery for my multimeter, about every 3 years or so. Not happy about it, considering how long I've actually used the multimeter, during a 3 year period.

    I would like to buy this adapter (AC/DC Adapter - 9VDC 0.6A) and splice the end with a 9v batter terminal adapter:
    https://www.rpelectronics.com/rpr-09600-p5-ac-dc-adapter-9vdc-0-6a.html

    Is this ok, or should I be weary of anything? I really don't want to start any fires. Any insight is greatly appreciated.

    Yonut
     
  2. Bluejets

    Bluejets

    4,748
    999
    Oct 5, 2014
    Should be ok.
    If you use an adaptor, you could avoid the need to splice anything.
    Get one the size to fit your power adaptor plug.

    Just watch and test polarity "before" plugging in.
     

    Attached Files:

    Yonut27 likes this.
  3. Yonut27

    Yonut27

    6
    0
    Jun 3, 2021
    Ty for your response.

    That part would be cool, does it have a specific name? I can't seem to locate it with my searches (power adapter adapter?!?).

    EDIT:
    Ok, I tineye'd the photo you uploaded and found out it is called 'Female DC Power adapter - 2.1mm jack to screw terminal block' (size may vary).

    Ty.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2021
  4. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    11,416
    2,619
    Nov 17, 2011
    Using an AC adapter frees you from changing batteries but binds you to using the meter near an outlet. Personally I find that impractical.
    Changing batteries every 3 years is not that troublesome, is it? I use quality alkalines and they last more than 3 years when not used.
     
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  5. Yonut27

    Yonut27

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    Jun 3, 2021
    It actually frees me from buying 9V's, as this is the only device that I have that uses them. I also have to be honest, There has only been one time I've needed to use my multimeter in a real world situation (away from my desk/lab), and there was a plug available.

    I appreciate your input though.
     
  6. crutschow

    crutschow

    43
    15
    May 7, 2021
    You could also consider a rechargeable 9V.
     
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  7. Yonut27

    Yonut27

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    Jun 3, 2021
    I have thought about it. Butthat would require a separate charger, as I only have the "La Crosse BC700" and it only does AA's and AAA's. https://www.lacrossetechnology.com/products/bc700

    I have enough rechargeable batteries to make a battery pack and use a voltage regulator to lower it to 9V, but that requires 8 batteries. I can use that in a pinch, but I'd need 8 rechargeables (NiMH) just sitting around, because running around the house collecting batteries to use (and making sure they're charged enough), would be more of a hassle.

    Ty for the input though.
     
  8. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

    3,408
    926
    May 12, 2015
    I'm astonished that replacing a battery every 3 years causes you problems.

    If I were you, I wouldn't cut any wires to the meter.
    Instead, make a 'fly lead' from the DC female jack and the connector from the 9V battery. (the battery itself).
    Cut the battery connector away from the battery and join it to the DC connector. Bottom example in picture below.
    Now you can use the battery when away from the bench and the mains adapter when at the bench.
    Best of both worlds.. A DIY battery eliminator.. Or buy the lead already made..

    [​IMG]
    Martin
     
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  9. Yonut27

    Yonut27

    6
    0
    Jun 3, 2021
    Since you offered such a nice idea, I will clue you in to my woes.

    I'm creative during the day. But it seems just before bedtime, I get really creative. If I have an idea for a circuit, I get everything ready start building, and go to test. I don't get my desired results. I go check my calculations. After a bit, I settle on the battery being low. Then I get to go out to a gas station (normal stores have been closed for a couple of hours now), and buy a battery (of unknown age) for ~$10-12 CAD.

    That's the hassle. It's also a little of the grief of having the say... "Didn't I just buy this fricken battery?" and buying something other than gas from a gas station.

    Anyway, thanks for all the input.
     
  10. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

    3,408
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    May 12, 2015
    NO, that was fricken three years ago!.:p

    Martin
     
  11. Yonut27

    Yonut27

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    Jun 3, 2021
    3 years ago, or 2 uses ago? Ok, I'm cheap and I don't like getting ripped off.
     
  12. dave9

    dave9

    1,078
    292
    Mar 5, 2017
    It seems like a serious of bad choices, especially if paying that premium for batteries. How about a new meter that takes 2 x AA cells then use the same LSD rechargeable AA NiMH that you can make use of in other devices? Or even alkaline, in the case of AA I still find them useful for slow drain devices like clocks, remote controls, and of course multimeters.
     
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