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Crayola + big screen = disaster

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Deke, Dec 24, 2005.

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  1. Deke

    Deke Guest

    So the story begins with a 53" Panasonic HD RPTV, with a great picture.
    Then several unsupervised children got to the cabinet, and the screen with
    crayolas, and magic markers.The waxy crayons are now embedded in the very
    fine grooves of the screen, and I'm open to suggestions as to how to get
    them out. The set was traded in, a new screen is around $300 bucks, but I'd
    like to try to restore the original screen if possible. The easy stuff has
    been removed, and I'm thinking a hair dryer (on low) and a very fine nylon
    brush to soften and dig out whats embedded in the grooves.
    Any other suggestions?
    Happy Holidays!
    Deke

    --

    "I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year. I
    will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future. The Spirits of all Three
    shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that they teach."
    - Charles Dickens,
    A Christmas Carol, 1843
     
  2. A clothes iron set on warm with an old cotton t-shirt between the iron
    and the screen. Start with a low temp at first -- bump it up carefully.

    Jonesy
     
  3. Ken Weitzel

    Ken Weitzel Guest

    Hi...

    If "crayolas" are wax crayons, I wonder what the result might be if the
    screen were frozen, then gently flexed. Might not the frozen solid
    wax crack and fall off cleanly?

    Ken
     
  4. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest

    I suspect the screen would crack, most plastics get rather stiff when cold.
     
  5. Bob Urz

    Bob Urz Guest

    Perhaps take the screen out and take it to the manual car wash or a high
    pressure washer unit.

    Bob
     
  6. Take a look at what the Crayola folks suggest
     
  7. DaveM

    DaveM Guest

    Try using WD-40 on the screen. It's the same stuff that you pay big bucks
    for as a label and adhesive remover, but under a different label. It
    shouldn't harm the plastic on the screen, but will surely dissolve the wax
    from the crayons.
    The magic markers are a bit tougher if they are the permanent type. The
    WD-40 might work.. might not.. have to try it. If it doesn't work, you
    might try 91% isopropyl alcohol. Should be able to get that at a
    well-stocked drugstore. Be sure to test it first in a small spot in a
    corner of the screen to see if it attacks the plastic. If it doesn't bother
    the plastic, then it should clean the marker stains off quite well.

    Cheers!!!!
    --
    Dave M
    MasonDG44 at comcast dot net (Just substitute the appropriate characters in
    the address)

    Never take a laxative and a sleeping pill at the same time!!
     
  8. I don't know what it might do to the frosted finish of the screen, but
    I've had amazing results at getting "dry marker" (as used on
    whiteboards) off of plastic monitor cases using those blue and white
    "Mr. Clean" magic pads -- forgot the exact name, but you can find them
    in your local supermarket. They also work great for cleaning "kid marks"
    off of painted walls.

    Mineral spirits would be unlikely to harm the plastic, but would
    dissolve wax -- eventually. Use a toothbrush to get in the grooves, and
    wipe up immediately with clean paper towels.

    Isaac
     
  9. Asimov

    Asimov Guest

    "Deke" bravely wrote to "All" (24 Dec 05 10:45:35)
    --- on the heady topic of "Crayola + big screen = disaster"

    Wax tends to melt around 180'F. I might try dabbing a corner of a
    cloth in boiling water (212'F) and soak up the wax with it.

    A*s*i*m*o*v


    De> From: "Deke" <no >
    De> Xref: core-easynews sci.electronics.repair:352462



    De> So the story begins with a 53" Panasonic HD RPTV, with a great
    De> picture. Then several unsupervised children got to the cabinet, and the
    De> screen with crayolas, and magic markers.The waxy crayons are now
    De> embedded in the very fine grooves of the screen, and I'm open to
    De> suggestions as to how to get them out. The set was traded in, a new
    De> screen is around $300 bucks, but I'd like to try to restore the
    De> original screen if possible. The easy stuff has been removed, and I'm
    De> thinking a hair dryer (on low) and a very fine nylon brush to soften
    De> and dig out whats embedded in the grooves. Any other suggestions?
    De> Happy Holidays!
    De> Deke

    De> --

    De> "I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year.
    De> I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future. The Spirits of
    De> all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that
    De> they teach." - Charles Dickens,
    De> A Christmas Carol, 1843

    .... Sattinger's Law: It works better if you plug it in.
     
  10. kip

    kip Guest

    DO NOT USE MR. CLEAN
     
  11. Whatever you use, test it in an inconspicuous corner first!

    --- sam | Sci.Electronics.Repair FAQ: http://www.repairfaq.org/
    Repair | Main Table of Contents: http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/
    +Lasers | Sam's Laser FAQ: http://www.repairfaq.org/sam/lasersam.htm
    | Mirror Sites: http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/F_mirror.html

    Important: Anything sent to the email address in the message header above is
    ignored unless my full name is included in the subject line. Or, you can
    contact me via the Feedback Form in the FAQs.
     
  12. Art

    Art Guest

    Amazing: No one mentioned the probable removal of the dark material in the
    grooves along with the residue of the crayons! I may become a problem if the
    materials between the grooves, matrial put there to enhance the contrast
    ratio, also comes off. This will result in more of a problem for the end
    user.FYI
    I presume maybe experimenting is an area, other then the centre of the
    screen, to see what effect is maximized would be prudent.
    "Deke" bravely wrote to "All" (24 Dec 05 10:45:35)
    --- on the heady topic of "Crayola + big screen = disaster"

    Wax tends to melt around 180'F. I might try dabbing a corner of a
    cloth in boiling water (212'F) and soak up the wax with it.

    A*s*i*m*o*v


    De> From: "Deke" <no >
    De> Xref: core-easynews sci.electronics.repair:352462



    De> So the story begins with a 53" Panasonic HD RPTV, with a great
    De> picture. Then several unsupervised children got to the cabinet, and the
    De> screen with crayolas, and magic markers.The waxy crayons are now
    De> embedded in the very fine grooves of the screen, and I'm open to
    De> suggestions as to how to get them out. The set was traded in, a new
    De> screen is around $300 bucks, but I'd like to try to restore the
    De> original screen if possible. The easy stuff has been removed, and I'm
    De> thinking a hair dryer (on low) and a very fine nylon brush to soften
    De> and dig out whats embedded in the grooves. Any other suggestions?
    De> Happy Holidays!
    De> Deke

    De> --

    De> "I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year.
    De> I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future. The Spirits of
    De> all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that
    De> they teach." - Charles Dickens,
    De> A Christmas Carol, 1843

    .... Sattinger's Law: It works better if you plug it in.
     
  13. Deke

    Deke Guest

    The removal of black stripe in the bottom of the groove concerns me also,
    but the set is unwatchable now anyway.
    First I'm going to try the hairdryer with a microfiber cloth,
    if that doesnt work I'll try the WD-40. Oddly enough, the magic marker came
    off easily, so I think it must have been the dry erase type.
    I want to say Thank You! to all who answered, and I'll post again after I
    experiment a bit, and let all know how it turned out.

    Peace
    Deke
     
  14. The best way to remove wax from most things is to freeze it. It will likely
    just pop off. The dyes in the crayons may be the bigger problem. I would
    NOT use heat.

    Leonard
     
  15. Bob Shuman

    Bob Shuman Guest

    If you do succeed in getting this cleaned up, you may want to look into
    seeing if the manufacturer offers a plastic screen shield as an option. I
    know these are not cheap and do tend to reduce the screen intensity a bit,
    but as you have learned could pay for itself if you have little ones.

    Bob
     
  16. Interesting about the WD-40

    How to remove Crayons (Regular) from glass and porcelain:
    Materials

    Sponge
    Liquid dishwashing detergent
    Soft cloth
    WD-40® (car part lubricant)
    Warm water
    Procedure
    Spray the surface to be cleaned with WD-40 and wipe clean with a soft
    cloth. If residue remains add liquid dishwashing soap to water. Wash the
    surface with a sponge working in a circular motion and rinse.

    Return to Step 1 and select another product
     
  17. Deke

    Deke Guest

    Sorry, I have two dogs, no kids. The rug rats who caused the damage
    belonged to the last owner of the set.
    I just want to get it back into watchable condition, and sell it.

    Deke
    the previous
     
  18. Deke

    Deke Guest

    First I went over the screen with a spray bottle of heavy duty tire/vinyl
    cleaner made for use on cars. It took a surprising amount of the embedded
    crayon/whoknowswhat out of the grooves of the screen. I followed this with
    WD-40, and the screen looks like new! I used a nylon scrub brush on both
    applications, doing a small area at a time with vertical strokes, then
    immediately wiping it down with a thick plush towel. After it was all over,
    I discovered several cracks in the screen, evidently caused by the previous
    owners brats using the tv to bounce things of off. Nothing I can do about
    that. In several spots the fine grooves of the screen were actually laid
    over and deformed due to impacts, causing those spots to refract light
    differently and show up as either light or dark spots. So, I took a small
    wire metal brush, about 1/4 " wide, with metal bristles about 3/8" long,
    (very stiff!) and carefully went down the damaged grooves and managed to
    straighten them out. Its not perfect, but you have to know where to look to
    see the spots now. The whole thing took about 4 hours, but after I was
    finished, it looked awesome, for a 3 year old HD RPTV.
    This extreme cleaning hasnt seemed to effect the contrast,
    and after cleaning the CRTs and the mirror, it looks quite sellable, at
    $600. BTW, I used a DVD player with a blue screensaver hooked up thru
    component to see the dings/crud in/on the screen as I worked.
    Thanks for all your help!
    Deke
     
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