Connect with us

could someone please identify this component for me?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Liam O'Rourke, Sep 4, 2016.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. Liam O'Rourke

    Liam O'Rourke

    19
    0
    Aug 31, 2016
    hi Could someone please tell what the cuboid shaped beige components in the attached image are please?
    The ones with the black writing that says '1j63' on them and the one with '33j63' on it.
    Thanks a lot
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Minder

    Minder

    3,018
    640
    Apr 24, 2015
    0.1μf and 0.33uF capacitors .
    M.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 9, 2016
  3. Liam O'Rourke

    Liam O'Rourke

    19
    0
    Aug 31, 2016
    thanks a lot. is there a name for the style of component? ie. electrolytic, ceramic etc.
    thanks
     
  4. Minder

    Minder

    3,018
    640
    Apr 24, 2015
    Probably ceramic.
    Max.
     
  5. Liam O'Rourke

    Liam O'Rourke

    19
    0
    Aug 31, 2016
    ceramic? Surely there is a name that would differentiate them from the more common type of ceramic capacitor. Ie... the disk style ones
     
  6. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,671
    1,892
    Sep 5, 2009
    definitely not ceramic
    they are more likely to be mylar or polyprop. most likely the later


    Dave
     
  7. Liam O'Rourke

    Liam O'Rourke

    19
    0
    Aug 31, 2016
    so
    yeah i dint think theyd be ceramic i just said that cus 'minder' said they were. Anyways... thanks again
     
  8. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

    4,543
    2,116
    Jun 21, 2012
    They appear to be 0.1 μF and 0.33 μF, respectively, metalized plastic-film capacitors. Plastic film can be a lot of things, but Mylar and polypropylene are common, as @davenn stated. There are dozens of others. At the capacitance given, definitely not mica... too small in size and mica is usually encapsulated in a different material. These are either by-pass or timing capacitors. Quality and reliability of this type of capacitor is usually high. For timing use, the dielectric has to be a low-absorption type for good repeatability. This Wikipedia article has a good discussion and pictures of example types.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2016
    Moiz Nagaria likes this.
  9. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,671
    1,892
    Sep 5, 2009
    as I stated ;) ;)
     
  10. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

    4,543
    2,116
    Jun 21, 2012
    Oops. Fixed it.
     
  11. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,671
    1,892
    Sep 5, 2009
    out of curiosity, have you seen silver mica caps ?
    They can be VERY small down to at least a 1/4 of the size of those caps in the photo. Ones I commonly use
    are from a few 10's of pF to a few 100's of pF

    Yes, the SMica ones are usually dipped in a brown resin :)

    I scrounge everyone I can get off old boards, treat them like gold ... difficult to buy.
    Used in RF Transmitter circuits, very stable under temperature



    Dave
     
  12. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

    4,543
    2,116
    Jun 21, 2012
    Hundreds of picofarads for mica capacitors is common. A few microfarads is unheard of. I have a transmitter mica stashed away somewhere that is good for a few dozen amperes of RF current. It is mounted in a three or four inch diameter ceramic cylinder with heavy metal mounting plates/electrodes on the ends. If I can find it, I'll take a photo and post it here. At one time I thought it might make a good DC blocking cap for a high-power amateur radio final amplifier... not that I would deliberately run it at ten kilowatts output power... that would be illegal, except perhaps into a dummy load.:D

    And, yeah, I treasure dipped silvered mica capacitors too. I don't know what the resin is, but it is really tough stuff... some sort of epoxy maybe.
     
    davenn likes this.
  13. Andy Dowell

    Andy Dowell

    3
    0
    Sep 8, 2016
    Generally, in the Eighties, Digikey reffered to them as Plessey box capacitors. I see them referred to as metalized polyester - but more research might be made to confirm.

    33j63 would be .33 uF, "j" is tolerance of 5 (or 10)% _I forget which), and 63 is voltage.

    a
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 9, 2016
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-