Connect with us

Copy a PAL

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by russ lavergne, Jan 17, 2006.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. I have two pal chips. both are the same but one is bad. Can I purchase a
    blank one and copy the one good chip onto the new chip or are all Pal chips
    copy protected. Here are the numbers on it

    BDB219743
    Altera
    EPM7064LC84-15

    Who might sell them and what would I use to copy it if it can be done.

    Thanks
    Russ
     
  2. Bob Urz

    Bob Urz Guest

  3. Asimov

    Asimov Guest

    "russ lavergne" bravely wrote to "All" (17 Jan 06 07:43:53)
    --- on the heady topic of "Copy a PAL"

    I think that is the whole point of the P in pal. It is a GAL with a
    PROM in it. The PROM part means once the fuse gate is blown it can't
    be read back again. However, I suppose with a logic analyzer it could
    be reverse engineered depending on how complicated it is.

    A*s*i*m*o*v


    rl> From: "russ lavergne" <>
    rl> Xref: core-easynews sci.electronics.repair:355502

    rl> I have two pal chips. both are the same but one is bad. Can I
    rl> purchase a blank one and copy the one good chip onto the new chip or
    rl> are all Pal chips copy protected. Here are the numbers on it

    rl> BDB219743
    rl> Altera
    rl> EPM7064LC84-15

    rl> Who might sell them and what would I use to copy it if it can be done.

    rl> Thanks
    rl> Russ

    .... Letterman of Borg - "Ok, Top 10 reasons why resistance is futile:"
     
  4. Guest

    Some old PAL chips, xxVyy-type ones, anyway, will allow their fuse maps
    to be read out, but I think there may be a security fuse to disallow
    this. I just sold an ancient PAL burner that had a "duplicate" mode.

    But I think the altera chip in this case is a few generations newer. I
    have no idea how it'd work with this one.
     
  5. Ah, yes. The MAX7000 series.

    If the security bit has not been set in the original part
    (something that's done during initial programming), then it is possible
    to read the device and copy it as well.

    HOWEVER -- That particular device (and series) are not PALs.
    They're far more complex. In fact, that's what leads to their acronymic
    name 'CPLD' (Complex Programmable Logic Device).

    Reading and programming such devices requires high-end programming
    hardware that can handle 84-pin PLCC packages AND CPLD devices. This
    combination usually equals a minimum of a four-figure price tag, often
    five.

    You have another potential problem, one of availability. I've
    checked DigiKey, Mouser, Newark, and Allied. None of them have this part
    listed in their catalog. Your best bet for obtaining one may be to
    contact Altera directly (www.altera.com) and ask about a sample.

    If you lack access to the necessary programming hardware, I offer
    programming services at what I believe are very competitive rates.

    http://www.bluefeathertech.com/devices.html

    Programming/copying for a single such device would run you $22.00,
    and that includes free return shipping via USPS Priority Mail.

    Happy hunting.


    --
    Dr. Anton T. Squeegee, Director, Dutch Surrealist Plumbing Institute.
    (Known to some as Bruce Lane, ARS KC7GR,
    kyrrin (a/t) bluefeathertech[d=o=t]calm -- www.bluefeathertech.com
    "If Salvador Dali had owned a computer, would it have been equipped
    with surreal ports?"
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-