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converting vacuum tubes

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by rogerwilco, Sep 3, 2010.

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  1. rogerwilco

    rogerwilco

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    Sep 3, 2010
    I'm working on a Circuits project of a 1950s amp for a ami jukebox and i was wondering if it was possible to convert high voltage 6L6G and 5U4G vacuum tubes to
    a new circuit using now a days parts??? If so what would that Circuit look like?
     

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    Last edited: Sep 3, 2010
  2. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

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    Jan 15, 2010
    I'm sure it can be converted (I don't have advice for how). What I'm responding to, is
    WHY would you want to convert it? It'll destroy the collector value of it, when you want to sell it. The 6L6 and 5U4's are readily available from a lot of places.
    I've got some old pinball machines that are valuable BECAUSE they're original parts. The value of items like this are radically reduced when you refurbish them with new parts. Just something to think about. I know you just want to use it to listen to music, but I'd consider keeping it's value up, by not replacing the internal parts with modern-day circuits.
     
  3. rogerwilco

    rogerwilco

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    Sep 3, 2010
    well you see my dad has been trying to fix these things for like 20 years so i am doing it for him. but im a poor college kid and vacuum tubes are very costly!! not only that but the tubes will burn out again, so i was looking for a better fix
     
  4. Militoy

    Militoy

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    Aug 24, 2010
    If you are unable or unwilling to repair it, rather than ruining the considerable collector value of your jukebox by butchering the amp - why not at least consider swapping the entire amp for a modern modular transistor amp, in a manner that can be reversed? Any way you look at it, "upgrading" your existing amp is very likely to be more expensive than swapping the amp, or just replacing the tired tubes and maybe a few caps. It looks to me like parts for the AMI jukeboxes are readily available online.
     
  5. Resqueline

    Resqueline

    2,848
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    Jul 31, 2009
    In the 60's-70's I believe there were some semiconductor based tube replacements available. It might be possible to make such plug-in replacements for this amp., but..
    Unless the jukebox is going to see 24/7 professional duty I'd go with an original tube fix. By the time they wear out again you'll have a job. But don't hack it, whatever you do.
     
  6. rogerwilco

    rogerwilco

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    Sep 3, 2010
    Militoy - because the turntable motor control is build in to the amp its self.
     
  7. Militoy

    Militoy

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    Aug 24, 2010
    Well – that adds a small complication – but it should still be possible to find a spot to locate a transistor amp module, and bypass the original amp without removing it. The amp shouldn’t take up too much room – after all, miniaturization was the main reason transistors were invented. Short of that solution, changing over to solid-state is likely to be a complex undertaking. For instance – here is one guy’s solution to a similar problem (remember – this is for just one tube):

    http://www.antiqueradios.com/marc/1l6.html

    Another solution for replacing hard-to-find octal tubes that’s very clever, but kind of time-consuming:

    http://www.dialcover.com/tubes.html

    I’m still betting that your best solution will be a straight repair job, using tubes. Your most economical fix is probably bypassing the amp.
     
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