Connect with us

Convert from 4 to 8 ohms

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by CMarangon, Feb 3, 2013.

  1. CMarangon

    CMarangon

    14
    0
    Feb 3, 2013
    Hello!

    I bought an used Sony Home Theater model STR k660P able to reproduce a six channel surround sound multichannel audio (5.1). It says in its back that the output impedance can be form 6 to 16 ohm for each speaker system.

    However, I already had the speakers system and 2 of them are of 4 ohms.


    My question:
    How can I convert from 4 to 8 ohms. Put a 4 ohms resistor in series?
    It works, but with some lost of power and quality.

    Put two speaker of 4 ohms in series will also not work
    because they do not fit in the speaker system.

    Is there another way to convert it from 4 to 8 ohms?
     
  2. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    5
    Apr 7, 2012
    I would personally be surprised if the amp can not drive a 4 Ohm load (regardless of the stamped rating), my advise don't sweat it too much unless you are running these things at maximum volume and pushing the limits, or experience a thermal shut down... If you are only running them at minimal volume levels I doubt you will experience any issues with the 4 Ohm load... The mix max of load will diminish performance but as you have found trying to force shift the load with a resistor will also have effects and diminish performance even more as well as being a waste...

    Putting another speaker in series is the better option, even if it's in a different enclosure...

    Best option is to get new speakers that match...
     
  3. CMarangon

    CMarangon

    14
    0
    Feb 3, 2013
    Indeed, to try to find an 8 ohms speaker that matches is my first option.
    My 2nd option is to put a resistor in series.
    I also have a 3r option. In my city there is a man that refurbish speakers. Maybe he can convert it to 8 ohms, but for that he needs to have the repair kit, that is hard to find for this kind of speaker (8 ohms, 3 inches, 25 WRMS speaker)

    Thanks for your reply.
     
  4. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,345
    1,774
    Sep 5, 2009
    you will just waste a lot of power in the resistor

    as CC said ... I would be suprised if your system couldnt drive 4 Ohm speakers without any hassles

    Dave
     
  5. CMarangon

    CMarangon

    14
    0
    Feb 3, 2013
    It says in its back part: SPEAKERS 6 to 16 ohms.
    Indeed, I am a little afraid to connect a 4 ohms speaker there.

    Thanks for reply.
     
  6. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    5
    Apr 7, 2012
    We understand that, but based on an educated guess we suspect that 4 Ohms will be just fine... Most all audio circuitry and ICs made today will drive down to 2 or 4 Ohms without issue... The system as designed will likely work optimal with the specified 6 to 16 Ohm load but that doesn't necessarily mean it won't work with 4 Ohms... As I said unless you are pushing the system to the max, I highly doubt you will have any issues, using 4 Ohm speakers you will get more 'volume' at lower volume levels with the 4 Ohm speakers aka what you hear at volume setting 4 with 4 Ohm speakers is likely the same volume that you will hear at 5 or 6 with 8 Ohm speakers... This is why I suggest not pushing it to the limits with the lower Ohm speakers, you will get inferior sound and more distortion, something that won't happen with the 'proper stamped speaker ratings'...
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-