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Convert a 6 volt to 12 volt on my motor cycle . Any ideas how that's done

Discussion in 'Sensors and Actuators' started by Chrisbyrd31, Jun 15, 2016.

  1. Chrisbyrd31

    Chrisbyrd31

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    Jun 15, 2016
    Need some help trying to figure out how to convert my motor cycle to 12 volt because as of right now it's 6 volt system it's a 1980 Suzuki 4oo gn and its kick start
     
  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    hi
    welcome to EP

    you have a good reason for this I assume ?
     
    Chrisbyrd31 likes this.
  3. Chrisbyrd31

    Chrisbyrd31

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    Jun 15, 2016
    Yes I'm trying to convert my motor cycle and I have no clue about electric at all . I hope the is ok to ask?
     
  4. duke37

    duke37

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    You have not said why you wish to do it.
    Please post a schematic of the wiring, the one I tried to download locked up my computer.
    It should be possible to provide 12V for ancillary devices but would take a lot of effort and cost to convert the alternator and ignition
     
    hevans1944 likes this.
  5. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    Jun 21, 2012
    It is easy to up-convert a 6 V system to 12 V to operate modern accessories: just add a boost converter that powers only the added components. Is there a problem obtaining a 6 V motorcycle battery? Is the alternator on the fritz? Please tell us: WHY do you want to go the expense and labor of re-wiring your entire motorcycle electrical system?
     
  6. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    Jun 21, 2012
    You can ask anything here. I found a wiring diagram for your motorcycle. Does it make any sense to you? If not, then changing from a 6V system to a 12V system is not your cup of tea.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Alec_t

    Alec_t

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    Jul 7, 2015
    So, based on that wiring diagram you will have to upgrade :- the magneto, the ignition coil, the CDI unit, the turn signal relay, the tachometer, the battery, all the bulbs and the resistors. Sounds mega-expensive. What advantage are you hoping to gain from a 12V system?
     
  8. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    yes OK to ask, but you didn't answer my Q .... WHY do you want to convert to 12V ?
    when we know why, there may be other ways to achieve you final goal

    do you think you can handle the schematic, hevans1944 posted ?

    Dave
     
  9. Chrisbyrd31

    Chrisbyrd31

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    Jun 15, 2016
    I want to upgrade it to 12 V because the only thing I'm running is a headlight and a taillight I have no turn signals are not my bike is an outlaw bike but I keep blowing bulbs in the lights go down when you ride I just really want something different
     
  10. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    so are you prepared for the lots of work and cost converting all the other parts to 12V ? .... that assuming they are even available as parts for your bike ?
    As Alec_t stated there's a bunch of parts you will have to change and he didn't mention all of them in his list

    I really see no reason for doing this, seems very expensive and pointless exercise.

    now maybe you should really be trying to find out why 6V light globes are blowing on a 6V system instead. That would be a much wiser move.
    There is obviously an electrical fault that needs to be sorted out, if what you are saying is correct

    Now had you said you had a couple of accessories you wanted to add to the bike and they require 12V, that would be different and there are voltage booster modules
    that can create a 12V supply from a 6V supply that you could use to power them


    Dave
     
  11. Alec_t

    Alec_t

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    Jul 7, 2015
    What I don't see in the wiring diagram is any sort of voltage regulator. It's no wonder you keep blowing bulbs. IMO you'd be better spending your money on a good after-market voltage regulator, because without one you'd still be blowing bulbs if you converted the system to 12V.
     
  12. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

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    Aug 21, 2015
    Sires . . . . . . .



    Looks like you do not live ALONE

    http://kzrider.com/forum/4-electrical/274042-keep-blowing-headlights?tmpl=component&type=raw

    https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20110916084102AAuZK9X

    http://www.ride-joy.com/DR500-voltage-regulator_10184289.html




    Looks like a temporary lashed mounting of a DVM to the handlebars for a continual monitoring of the battery voltage , then a seeing of just how HIGH the
    voltage to the lamps might reach, at higher road speeds, might be in order .

    I don't know if the old . . . . . greasy fingers to glass envelope bulb . . . . .syndrome also pertains, in not knowing if they are being Halogen lamps.


    73's de Edd
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 16, 2016
  13. duke37

    duke37

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    Jan 9, 2011
    There is a resistor allied to the magneto which is switched. Presumably this is a charge rate adjuster but without detailed information it would be impossible to see how this could be improved.

    The simplest way out of the problem would be to change from bulbs to LEDs with appropriate control circuitry. Even a simple resistor would work. 6V should be enough and no need to be closely controlled. You would get more light and a long lifetime
     
    hevans1944 likes this.
  14. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

    2,744
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    Aug 21, 2015
    Mo' "Motocycle" Musings . . . . .
    (I duz knoes hows to spels)


    AN ANALYTICAL EVALUATION:


    The left windings of that magneto is associated with the electronic ignition.
    It being variable frequency AC and is DC converted within the ignition module.

    Part of the magnetos right half windings are associated with charging the 6 V 4 AH battery
    (Now isn't 4AH about equated with the "power punch" of 4 "D" cells )
    And the lighting looks to be using variable frequency AC from a part of the mags right half windings.
    BUT on the 400 wiring diagram that I consulted, there is being an AC shunt regulator that goes to ground from the light line.
    All that would be needed is vibration . looseness or corrosion to corrupt that grounding of the shunt regulator and then the AC lighting voltage could go to max at max speeds.
    (That's where the mentioned road testing and "lashed on" monitoring of the light voltage supply comes into play.)
    To evaluate AC shunt regulation, the ground connection could be removed and then a clip lead used for grounding.
    Get up to max output voltage and then disconnect the grounding, to see just how HIGH that voltage could get, without its shunt regulation being provided.

    Now, some of the " you are a peein' " folks need to fill me in, but isn't there some requirement that if you park on / beside a small rural two lane road overnight, that you need to leave your park lights on.
    We have no such requirements here, on the AMERIKANSKI scene.
    That seems to be the manner, that the ( P) switching on the unit is being arranged, in respect to the way that the battery connection is being routed. to a portion of the lighting

    No further info from me, until I see if the originator ever shows up again.



    73's de Edd
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 18, 2016
  15. Firdog

    Firdog

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    Jun 6, 2019
    I might be late on this.
    I have the same bike. The 6vlt battery is available but it seems to get overcharged and cook the battery in a year or 500 miles. I am interested in adding resistor or a regulator to control input voltage back to the 6vlt battery itself.
    Can someone help with this scenario?
    My bike is wired complete to diagram. Do not blow out bulbs.
    Suggest a way to control or regulate the voltage back to the battery?
    Thinking it shouldn’t be higher than 4.5 volts dc.
    Thanks
     
  16. Alec_t

    Alec_t

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    Jul 7, 2015
    Welcome to EP!
    Actually, you need a voltage regulator set to about 6.9V to charge a "6V" lead acid battery.
    Have a read of this.
     
  17. Firdog

    Firdog

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    Jun 6, 2019
    Yes thanks for the correction Alec. It is a 6vdc so I do want to be controlling about 6.9 to 7.2.
     
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