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Connecting wires

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by kaspis245, Oct 30, 2016.

  1. kaspis245

    kaspis245

    3
    0
    Oct 30, 2016
    Sorry If this seems like a stupid question. I don't know much about electronics. I am making a CNC stand and I need to connect wires that are shown in the picture. How can I do that?
    [​IMG]
     
  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,327
    1,769
    Sep 5, 2009
    hi
    welcome

    there are lots of variations of inline strip terminals and plugs and sockets

    what voltage and current will be on these wires ?
     
  3. oz93666

    oz93666

    39
    1
    Dec 7, 2014
    First you need to take a cm of plastic insulation off the three so they all look like the green wire .

    Then securely connect the exposed metal wire to it's partner of the same colour. It looks like the wires have a 'crimp' connector ... push the wire into the connector and squeeze the metal connector with pliers so that wire is firmly attached . then you need to put insulation tape around all the exposed connectors so they can't touch each other and short out .... if you don't have insulation tape , sellotape will probably do.
     
  4. kaspis245

    kaspis245

    3
    0
    Oct 30, 2016
    Ok, I am not sure about the part where I have to squeeze the connector with pliers. How hard do I need to squeeze?
    Does it have to look like this, or did I squeeze to hard:
    [​IMG]
     
  5. duke37

    duke37

    5,253
    726
    Jan 9, 2011
    I would use heat shrink sleeving for insulation but it is too late if the wires are already joined.
    I would also solder for a good connection.
     
  6. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

    2,728
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    Aug 21, 2015
    Sir kaspis24 . . . . .

    I can't see your total wire length that is being available.
    If you have minimal wire length available, and then have to keep all splices lateral; to each other, the combined wirings developed pod will be slightly sizeable . . .ergo . . . "pod"..
    Since you will need a HEAVY insulator around each wire to assure against each area from being pressed against its mate . . .which would be beside each other . . .and any possible shorting.

    With that denoted . . .your shown green wire could be clipped a bit and inserted inside of the square female mating GREEN connector, then soldered. Repeat for all the other wires
    ALWAYS remember to have the insulators installed and slid back away from the splicing area, Then slide them back to cover the soldered joints.

    If you have adequate wire length available, you can cut wires to create a stagger splice, but it requires some cut off wire lengths.
    BUT it will totally separate each splice.

    STAGGER SPLICING:

    upload_2016-10-30_4-16-53.png

    As far as my procedure, I follow the above and then lap joint wires and then overwrap the wires as being shown in page 69 fig 19-7 of this info below.

    http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/codeq/doctree/NSTD87394A.pdf

    Thassssit . . . . . . .

    73's de Edd
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 30, 2016
  7. kaspis245

    kaspis245

    3
    0
    Oct 30, 2016
    I need to remind you that I have no electrical appliances, connectors or anything like that. A tape and a pliers are probable the only things I know how to use. My plan now is to tape around the green wire and repeat the same process for all other wires.

    Is this kind of connection safe? Also, is there a huge between my method and others (with soldering...)? I am asking because I know an electrician who could do it, but if there is no significant difference, then I would stick to my method. Also bear in mind that this device would be used in a professional company so I would like it to look as best as possible. Would other electricians think that I am a complete idiot or they wouldn't care?
     
  8. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

    2,728
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    Aug 21, 2015
    Sir kaspis24 . . . . .

    OK . . .with those limitations fully noted, yet with consideration of a fully professional, resultant look.
    Use yourself a 4 section EURO style terminal block.
    Typically available from a FULL service hardware store or automotive supply.
    Considering that you had done the tinning of the green wire, prepare e 7 more of those, and you are in business.

    The tinning frees you of loose frazzled wires, plus it yields, compresses and conforms to the screw ends, for a better clamping.
    The infrastructure keeps the wire joints well separated.
    By the viewed wire gauge, looks like no HIGH current is being involved. but most of these spec out up in the 20A range .

    4 SECTION EURO TERMINAL BLOCK:


    upload_2016-10-30_10-9-48.png

    73's de Edd
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 30, 2016
  9. Minder

    Minder

    2,871
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    Apr 24, 2015
    You did not mention what part of the CNC system this involves?
    If it is integral to the machine, although I see you are in Lithuania, there are usually regulation's in place for installations in an industrial environment, for e.g. in N.A. we have the NFPA79 which covers the electrical codes for Industrial Machinery.
    If it is for one's own use, you can usually get away with less.
    M.
     
  10. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

    4,250
    2,001
    Jun 21, 2012
    "When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail." Your procedure will work. It won't look "pretty" or "professional".

    Safe is a relative term. If firmly pulled, the wires could slip out of your pliers-squeezed connection and the bare ends short against something. Soldering would help to prevent that kind of "accident" from occurring.

    The sharp edges of the existing pin receptacles after flattening with pliers (one of which you have already ruined by "crimping") need to be thickly wrapped to prevent "break through" of the plastic tape insulation, which will creep after wrapping. IMO, you would have been better off if you had just cut them off and spliced the wires together with a soldered connection and then taped the spliced connections. In heavy electrical wiring (which apparently this is NOT), electrician's plastic tape (or self-vulcanizing rubber tape) is traditionally over-wrapped with "friction tape" to provide increased mechanical protection of the spliced joint.

    Why would they care? It isn't their problem. If you wanted it to look as best as possible, you should have hired a professional electrician to make the connections. Then it would become their responsibility to make it safe, pretty, and professional looking.

    Your method will probably work. If it doesn't come apart, or overheat and melt the plastic tape because of excessive resistance in the "pliers-crimmped" connection, or cause arcs and sparks, a heavy overall wrapping of tape will hide the details. You do what you have to do, given limited tools and available parts to work with. A "correct" solution would have been to insert the original pin-receptacles in a mating connector and crimp mating male pins to the other four wires and insert them in another mating connector. Since pins and connectors are not available, you have to improvise. So, good luck with that.
     
  11. duke37

    duke37

    5,253
    726
    Jan 9, 2011
    If the wires carry more than 1A at 12V then get a qualified electrician with insurance to do the job. You should not learn how to do things when others are at risk.
     
    hevans1944 and davenn like this.
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