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Connecting up very small, curved pins.

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by AG12, Apr 2, 2017.

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  1. AG12

    AG12

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    Apr 2, 2017
    As part of an engineering project I have got two nanosecond clock modules for measuring time-of-flight of radio signals, but I'm unsure how to connect them as the pins are unlike any I have seen before.

    The clock module itself is about 12.5mm square, with 7 pins on each side, the pins step from about 0.7mm at the top to 0.4mm at the end (see datasheet here: http://www.mouser.com/ds/2/308/MC10E137-D-96374.pdf) the spacing between the pins is around 0.5mm.
    The tricky part is how to solder to these pins as they are curved underneath the chip (see pictures). Currently I can only think of bending the pins to act as through-hole pins, bending them further to act as surface-mount pins or soldering single core wire directly to them (very weak, messy and generally a bit of a bodge...).
    If anyone has any experience of using similar components or can think of any better way to do it then please let me know.
    Kind regards,
    Andy
    20170402_213435-1.jpg 20170402_213455-1.jpg 20170402_213626-1.jpg 20170402_213931-1.jpg
     
  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    NOOOOOO please don't

    they can already be used for that as they are
    or use the correct IC socket like this wi8th the appropriate pin count

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I don't know of any in that style that are designed for through board mounting

    some one else may do so


    Dave
     
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  3. Audioguru

    Audioguru

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    Sep 24, 2016
    Many ICs today are not made for people to solder them. Robots do it. Some ICs are soldered in an oven.
     
    AG12 likes this.
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    This package is certainly not impossible to hand solder. A surface mount socket for it may be (but isn't too hard with an oven).
     
  5. HellasTechn

    HellasTechn

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    Apr 14, 2013
    I agree with Audioguru, only above kind of chips are around ever since i remember myself (more than 30 years). I think this specific kind needs stencil and hot air station to be soldered.

    You could try soldering them directly on the PCB by creating a solder "hill" between the side of the chip and the PCB surface. Here is a video that may help a little.




    I beleave you can bend the legs straight, underneath and mount it on a BCB through hole.
     
    AG12 likes this.
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    I have some, so I know they were available at some stage.

    https://www.rockby.com.au/catresultsSql_12.cfm?Stock_no=40628

    Just an example. This is a plcc-32 socket, but I have no reason to think that plcc-28 are not similarly available.

    I just checked and the same place has them listed as out of stock.
     
    AG12 likes this.
  7. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Oh, and the pitch is 1.27mm, comparatively huge and almost trivial to hand solder if you know what you're doing.
     
  8. AG12

    AG12

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    0
    Apr 2, 2017
    Thank you everyone for the helpful and informative replies, I think I will get hold of two of the plcc-28s just because connecting to them is a lot easier and less permanent than soldering directly to the chip (and I haven't got the means to manufacture a breakout board).

    Another question I have is regarding connecting the counter to a raspberry pi so as to use it's 1.2 GHz clock. I know that there can be problems with signal attenuation at such high frequencies in longer wires. Would anyone know what I'll need to do regarding impedance or a maximum length of a connector?

    Andy
     
  9. Externet

    Externet

    772
    168
    Aug 24, 2009
    Soldering "J" pins instead of using the socket ---->
     
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