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Connecting LED Array to a microController?

Discussion in 'Microcontrollers, Programming and IoT' started by randomuser55, May 7, 2017.

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  1. randomuser55

    randomuser55

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    May 7, 2017
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    The microcontroller can't directly drive that array.

    You should have the microcontroller drive a transistor which will switch a relay.

    You could also control it via a MOSFET (a type of transistor) but you would require a common connection between the Arduino power supply and that of the it panel.

    Both are fairly simple.

    If you look in the resource section, I'm pretty sure we have a resource showing how to switch a load with a transistor.
     
  3. randomuser55

    randomuser55

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    May 7, 2017
    Thanks for the reply. Like I said, I am a complete noob when it comes to anything that has to do with electrical wiring. I'll take a look around in the resources, but I understand it about as much as a 5 year old lol. Anyway you could help me along?
     
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    No problems.

    What experience with larger electronics do you have?
     
  5. randomuser55

    randomuser55

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    May 7, 2017
    I've built my own gaming PC, as well as made minor repairs to power cords, such as replacing broken plugs.
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Ok.

    Do you have a multimeter? (very handy, but not absolutely essential)

    Do you have a soldering iron?

    Are you planning to just switch this array on and off relatively infrequently, or many times per second?
     
  7. randomuser55

    randomuser55

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    May 7, 2017
    I need it to strobe at a specific frequency, I do not have a multimeter, I believe I have a soldering iron somewhere, if not, I'll just run down to radio shack or home depot or something and get them
     
  8. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Ok, if it's flashing rapidly a relay is not a good option -- it will quickly wear out.
     
  9. randomuser55

    randomuser55

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    May 7, 2017
    What would my options be besides a relay? Or would I be better off finding a different set of LEDs?
     
  10. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    No, that's probably ok. A MOSFET should be able to switch it quite easily.

    What frequency do you want to switch it at? For what purpose?
     
  11. randomuser55

    randomuser55

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    May 7, 2017
    I'm experimenting with a theory a few of my buddies and I have about using a strobing light for plant growth, and what the possible benefits are. We have a sufficient LED light bar we can use for this, but it's old and cheap, with some of the LEDs having burnt out. We're still saving up for a separate lighting system, which I don't anticipate we'll have anytime soon, so this is just a small patch for the IR LEDs that are out. Frequency would vary as we would be experimenting with different ones, but no lower than 10Hz
     
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