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Conductive Cloth

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Mark, Mar 15, 2013.

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  1. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Looking for conductive cloth.

    Need small quantity.
    Needs to be very flexible.
    Needs to have a cloth i.e. non-conductive (cotton, poly etc) surface on
    both sides.
    Needs to shield against RF.

    Where can I find it?
     
  2. miso

    miso Guest

  3. Sjouke Burry

    Sjouke Burry Guest

    Buy silver or goldlaced cloth.
     
  4. Robert Macy

    Robert Macy Guest

    From vague memory, there is a medical product development company
    owned by a French company that one time designed a flexible pullover
    type shirt with inbedded conductors. They might pass on the name of
    the company that made the prototype shirts.

    try contacting Bob Stone 408 684 5110
    Tronics MedTech, Inc.
    1525 McCarthy Blvd., Suite 212
    Milpitas, CA 95035
    Tel: 408 541 1212
    Fax: 408 541 1763
    info AT tronicsmedtech.com

    Being an EMC Expert, I don't think you'll get the type of shielding
    you want, you could try firms that make flexible EMC shielding, but
    those products are pretty metallic.

    There is a company that makes 'home' products, and from memory may
    sell clothing specifically designed for shielding. Again from memory,
    ELF shielding. I just did a search in my data base and since can't
    remember their name, can't find it!

    Let me know if you want their name, and I'll make an effort to knock
    cobwebs off brain and find for you..
     
  5. Guest

  6. Wow, an RF protecting hat, someone's making money from the tin foil
    hat!
    (I liked the pic of the office with RF protecting fabric... and all
    the computer gear on the desk.)

    Fun,
    George H.
     
  7. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Looking for conductive cloth.
    I wonder if the electrostatic jackets and lab coats would work?
    Anyone know?

    There is no electrical connection. It is to be used as a barrier
    surrounding a sensitive device.
     
  8. Ecnerwal

    Ecnerwal Guest

    saran wrap

    reynolds wrap

    saran wrap

    Available at your grocery store. You might also find something suitable
    in a smaller quantity by ordering a hot sandwich (foil-paper composite
    and add a napkin.) Depending how small a quantity you need, gum,
    chocolate or cigarettes will also serve.
     
  9. Guest

    What frequency range ?

    For low frequencies, it should look like a Faraday cage. This at least
    requires some electric connections between the conductive surfaces in
    the trousers and in the jacket.

    Zippers are problematic, you may have to use some overlapping cloth
    and metallic snap buttons to cover the zipper. Depending on frequency,
    you may have to use metallic snap buttons at every 3 cm, making
    dressing and undressing quite painful.

    How about the head/face ? Is it covered or not ?

    The largest risk for RF damage is the eyes, since there are no thermal
    sensitive neurons in our eyes, so never look into a waveguide, which
    might even theoretically be powered up.

    The next sensitive part is our brain due to heat damage.

    What is the point of protecting the body from RF exposure, if the head
    is not protected ? If the head/face is not properly protected, any
    microwave radiation will penetrate from the opening for the neck into
    the lower body parts.
     
  10. josephkk

    josephkk Guest

    Not at all. Conductive hook and loop fastenings (Velcro (Tm)) are
    available. Elastic conductive fabrics are available as well.
    Conductive hat and veil, again with hook and loop fastenings.
    Actually, protecting the feet and hands are the toughest problems.

    ?-)
     
  11. mpm

    mpm Guest

    Wouldn't Space Shuttle tiles be a better solution for the Boing 787?
    They are very lightweight, or so I understand, and were able to keep (most of) the shuttles from burning up on re-entry.
     
  12. josephkk

    josephkk Guest

    It would contain the heat well, perhaps too well. At 3" thick it has an
    r-value around 1000 and weighs about 1 pound per square foot. It becomes
    ablative around 1200 C.

    ?-)
     
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