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Computer won't boot/shut down.

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by [email protected], Jul 31, 2006.

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  1. Guest

    I'm trying to troubleshoot a problem with a relative's computer. She
    has an Emachine (about 3 years old) and stated that her computer would
    not shut itself down. Even if she unplugs the machine from the wall
    outlet, the computer instantly tries to come on. She doesn't even have
    time to hit the switch.

    So, I'm thinking switch/power supply??

    But.....she also says that the green (hard drive?) light is constantly
    on
    and that the computer won't get past the blue screen. Just gibberish
    - no logo, no boot up, nothing.

    So is this a motherboard problem??? Maybe both???

    Any info is appreciated. Thanks
     
  2. Ray L. Volts

    Ray L. Volts Guest

    May well be a victim of this:

    http://badcaps.net/
     
  3. Not restricted to motherboards, power supplies suffer badly, i open all
    power supplies which are trashed by a local
    computer shop (if they are recent and 300W or more), i find bulged caps in
    70% of the cases and in about all of those
    cases replacing the bad caps fixes the power supply.
    Just did 3 450W gold edition PSU's.

    Bart Bervoets
     
  4. HarryHydro

    HarryHydro Guest

    Hi:
    I just visited this badcaps site. It reminded me of a board that
    was given to me that would trip the power supply. It turned out in the
    end, a tantalum cap was shorted, because it was backward, because the
    silkscreen was backward! I bet a lot of those boards went to waste.

    Thanks!
    HarryHydro
     
  5. HarryHydro

    HarryHydro Guest

    Hi:
    I just visited this badcaps site. It reminded me of a board that
    was given to me that would trip the power supply. It turned out in the
    end, a tantalum cap was shorted, because it was backward, because the
    silkscreen was backward! I bet a lot of those boards went to waste.

    Thanks!
    HarryHydro
     
  6. Ray L. Volts

    Ray L. Volts Guest


    yep.. I recently elected not to overhaul a 300 watter which had the bulged
    caps (for my own pc) because I happened to have a brand new 450W that came
    with a new case I bought, but had replaced it with a better Antec supply at
    time of pc build.
    A new replacement 300W same model is only about $16+ tax now, but the large
    filter caps for the thing run around $7 each! So, I would have bought a new
    300W anyway. Sometimes it's just more cost effective not to put time/labor
    into an overhaul -- even when it's your own unit. :)
    But luckily I had that spare supply, so I'm basically out no cost & no labor
    on this one. Did restuff the old Abit mobo with new caps, though.
    Digi-Key is a great supplier of oddball cap sizes. If they're out of one
    brand of the cap needed, they likely have another brand available -- or
    maybe I was just lucky. They're efficient, too. I ordered my mobo caps
    (cheap in quantity!) + other odd items. Was well over a hundred parts in
    total. Ordered in the morning and they shipped the package out that
    afternoon! And the order was correct -- that alone seems rare these days in
    general.
     
  7. Franc Zabkar

    Franc Zabkar Guest

    I once saw this in a mainframe card. The tantalum cap was involved in
    the CPU power-on-reset circuit. Customers stated that they had to
    switch their machines on and off several times before all the affected
    cards would power up correctly. Some machines had 6 cards.

    - Franc Zabkar
     
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