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component emitting audio - which is it!?!

Discussion in 'Audio' started by dogfish, Mar 19, 2013.

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  1. dogfish

    dogfish

    5
    0
    Mar 19, 2013
    Hi
    I have a pure sine wave inverter for my car which is emitting a high pitched low voltage alarm, even though the supplied voltage (measured at the board) is >2V higher (12.6V) than the trigger voltage (10.5V). This happens whenever the car's engine is turned off. The unit continues to deliver adequate 240V to plugged appliances.

    I would like to simply kill the component emitting the alarm audio, but don't know what it looks like.

    Can anyone help me identify it?

    Can I do this but keep the circuit board functional?

    thanks
    denis
     
  2. Electrobrains

    Electrobrains

    259
    5
    Jan 2, 2012
    Hello Denis

    If it's really an alarm component sounding, then it's probably a buzzer, that might look like this:
    [​IMG].

    I am sure you could easily remove it or squelch it with some sticky tape or hot glue.

    If it's not a real alarm sounding, it could be a high frequency transformer "screaming", because something inside it has loosened or gone into resonance.

    In general, it would be better to repair whatever is alarming, rather than killing it.
    If your oil-lamp alarms, you better not unplug it as a solution! (in fact that's what many do with medicaments on their bodies, treating symptoms rather than causes...)
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2013
  3. dogfish

    dogfish

    5
    0
    Mar 19, 2013
    thanks for that info.
    the alarm is sounding unnecessarily - the unit is fairly new and the supplied voltage is 2V above the voltage that the unit's specs state as the minimum.

    i would like to completely disable the alarm, rather than just mute it - my concern is how to do this without damaging the rest of the circuit

    cheers
    denis
     
  4. Electrobrains

    Electrobrains

    259
    5
    Jan 2, 2012
    You can usually desolder the component with a piece of desoldering braid (or stranded wire). See good instructions on for instance Youtube: desoldering.

    I usually desolder components quicker by adding much solder tin to all pins. Then keeping all spots hot and just lifting out the component. Superfluous tin can be removed with a solder pump, desoldering braid or just by moving a (clean) solder iron tip over the place.
    A bit of copper wire can help if there are many legs. See principle here (although this guy doesn't add any tin): desoldering with wire
     
  5. dogfish

    dogfish

    5
    0
    Mar 19, 2013
    would this be it?
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Electrobrains

    Electrobrains

    259
    5
    Jan 2, 2012
    Yes, that's the buzzer.
     
  7. dogfish

    dogfish

    5
    0
    Mar 19, 2013
    i stuck some epoxy putty down the hole and that sure shut the thing up. but now i've discovered that there's a protection circuit that kicks in some time later which turns the unit off.
    disabling that is somewhat beyond my skill level :(
     
  8. Electrobrains

    Electrobrains

    259
    5
    Jan 2, 2012
    If your circuit alarms and switches off when the input voltage is good, then something is not in order with your circuit. Or you overload the output.
     
  9. dogfish

    dogfish

    5
    0
    Mar 19, 2013
    something is not in order with the circuit.
    with the engine switched on, supplying 13.7V, the inverter is happy. it's powering only a laptop charger.
    the inverter is relatively new. i'm in the market for a less temperamental :rolleyes: replacement.
     
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