Connect with us

compact flash pinout question

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Mad Scientist Jr, Apr 19, 2004.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. looking into the CF slot, the top left pin broke in my compact flash
    reader, what is this used for and is it needed for the device to
    function?
    any help appreciated!
     
  2. I'd have thought the second question should be easy to answer by
    replacing it in the slot and trying it.
     
  3. Art

    Art Guest

    Is the pin indeed broken off or is it bent over?? Seen way too many with
    bent pins, also a [pain] challenge to correct and confirm functional. At the
    cost of reliable USB CF Readers??
     
  4. I'd have thought the second question should be easy to answer by
    Well here's why I'm asking - it *does* function as far as I can see.
    At least Win XP recognizes the CF card and I can browse the files. But
    I don't know if that pin is used for writing files, or for certain
    sectors on the CF card. So I am wary to use it for fear of losing data
    or damaging my CF card.
     
  5. Is the pin indeed broken off or is it bent over?? Seen way too many with
    The pin WAS bent, and when I tried to bend it back it broke. I figure
    it's worth asking, is the top left pin used, then I don't have to go
    out and get a new reader.
     
  6. Florian

    Florian Guest

    Piggybacking,


    Pins 1 and 50 are both ground, so if your "top left" pin is either of these,
    it's probably redundant, depending on how your reader and card(s) are wired.
    Test by filling the card(s) with large files and checking the MD5 sums.

    The CompactFlash spec is available at www.compactflash.org.
     
  7. Can you tell me how to check MD5 sums? Is there a utility for this?
     
  8. Florian

    Florian Guest

    Yes, there are quite a few. If you use Windows, try one of these:

    http://www.google.com/search?q=windows+md5sum

    What you need to do is select a set of files that just about fills up your
    card, compute the checksums, and copy the files to the card. Then eject the
    card, (perform any steps dictated by your card reader and Windows software
    interactions to purge any cached card data; rebooting at this point should be
    nearly 100% effective), reinsert the card, and verify the checksums on the
    files on the card. If they match, you're probably ok to use this particular
    card in your damaged reader.
     
  9. ok, thanks...
     
  10. Art

    Art Guest

    Understoood!! Cheers Mate, have a good day, Eh
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-