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College EE Textbook Recommendations

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Richard Kanarek, Mar 27, 2007.

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  1. Greetings.

    I have elderly Electronics Engineering text books, but I don't have
    any new/recent ones. For both my education and curiosity, I'd like to
    get some (one or more) newish EE college text books. GOOD ones -- and
    by "GOOD" I mean well written. I have a newish Electronics Technology
    text book that strikes me as being rather mediocre, even with its
    charming pastel printing and excessive diagrams. I certainly don't
    want to go out of my way to acquire mediocre EE textbooks, too.

    With regard to a particular area of study, I'd be interested in books
    relevant to digital logic and radio. I assume "digital logic" is self
    explanatory; by "radio" I mean anything somewhat related to what would
    be involved with designing a AM/FM radio receiver. e.g. mesh/node
    analysis; design of discrete "transistor" (Bipolar, FET) "circuits"
    (audio/RF); analysis of oscillators/filters; etc.

    For clarity:
    a. I am only interested in obtaining recommendations and titles/ISBN
    numbers. This is NOT a RFQ! ;-)
    b. I am interested in undergraduate/graduate EE (electronics) books.
    Clive "Max" Maxfield (http://www.maxmon.com/), for example, has
    probably written several good electronics related books (I have fond,
    if dim, recollections of "Bebop to the Boolean Boogie"). His books are
    not, however, college text books, so they are disqualified from this
    discussion. Ditto all the other various hobbyist/technology
    (non-Engineering)/miscellaneous electronics books.
    c. I'm looking for pointers to best-of-breed books. I'm perfectly
    capable of randomly locating unvetted textbooks via Internet searches.
    d. Although I'm located in the USA, a pointer towards a particularly
    good UK electronics engineering (again, NOT technology) text book
    would quite welcome (pip, pip)!


    Thanks in advance!


    Cordially,
    Richard Kanarek
     
  2. Jim Thompson

    Jim Thompson Guest

    Fundamentals never change!

    My 50 year-old MIT text books still serve me well.

    ...Jim Thompson
     
  3. linnix

    linnix Guest

    At the risk of dating myself. My 30 years old collections are
    priceless,
    although my wife keeps telling me to get rid of them for pennies in
    garage sales.

    Recently, a homeless man died in his van with his book collections.
    He could have been an engineer like you and me. I want to be buried
    with my books as well.
     
  4. Joerg

    Joerg Guest

    Even back when I was studying for my degree I didn't find college
    textbooks particularly helpful to achieve a true understanding. What
    really taught me radio and, to some extent, digital design was the ARRL
    Handbook. Surprisingly cheap, too. Later it was The Art of Electronics.
    Then Ulrich Rhode's Communications Receivers etc. Eventually I worked my
    way up to high level signal processing but that was after I had my masters.

    BTW, thanks for the hint about Purplus in the CAD group. Order came in.
    I wish I could fire up the new DesignCAD right away but too swamped with
    work right now.
     
  5. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    Have you checked the school's engineering library?

    Good Luck!
    Rich
     
  6. Jim Thompson

    Jim Thompson Guest

    "Designing" is an art. School books provide the fundamental *tools*
    necessary to carry out your art.

    ...Jim Thompson
     
  7. Guest

    Gee, the first revision of Gray and Meyer didn't have any CMOS analog
    in it. Low power CMOS analog design books came out later than than.

    Time marches on.
     
  8. Jim Thompson

    Jim Thompson Guest

    Do you need a book to "design"?

    All I care about are the device characteristics.

    I've never had a course in CMOS, yet I design ASIC's in it daily at
    the device level.

    Likewise I'm sure I could design a toooob amplifier if I wanted ;-)

    ...Jim Thompson
     
  9. Guest

    <http://www.amazon.com/Analysis-Design-Analog-Integrated-Circuits/dp/
    0471321680>
    http://www.artofelectronics.com/
    Phillip Allen's books are well done:
    http://www.aicdesign.org/
    I haven't read Sedra/Smith "Microelectronics", but I hear it is a good
    text.
    <http://www.amazon.com/Analog-Integrated-Circuits-Signal-Processing/dp/
    0471097977/ref=sr_1_2/102-8268039-0492929?
    ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1175018438&sr=8-2>
    if you can find a used copy. It is quite dated since it came out in
    the 80s.
     
  10. Joel Kolstad

    Joel Kolstad Guest

    The latest (5th) edition came out in 2003, but picking up an older edition is
    going to leave out very little (as Jim suggests, much of EE is relatively
    time-insensitive...).

    I like Sedra & Smith, although it is a little "heavy" for self-education
    unless you're going and being able to spot areas that can be skipped on the
    first go through; it's 1392 pages after all! It's what I used in college, but
    it really did serve as more of a reference than as a traditional textbook
    where you'd end up reading (almost) every page by the end of the course.
     
  11. john jardine

    john jardine Guest

    Yes. I'd strongly recommend it.
    Worth casually reading just for the some of its off-the-beaten-track stuff.
     
  12. Guest

    I started in MOS linear (as in NMOS, not CMOS) before Gray and Meyer
    updated their book. There were plenty of tricks in the ISSCC journals
    that were useful, but I would have liked to have it all summed up in a
    more "linear" fashion. I don't think education is a waste of time, but
    your mileage may vary.

    I suppose many of the things in the early papers were easily seen once
    your started simulations, such as the right hand plane zero issue in
    MOS op amps. Still, why reinvent the wheel?
     
  13. Jim Thompson

    Jim Thompson Guest

    I find that reinventing the wheel is very educational ;-)

    ...Jim Thompson
     
  14. Guest

    I came across Hamilton and Howard "Basic Integrated Circuit
    Engineering" at a swap meet. I don't believe it has been updated since
    it doesn't show up in Amazon. It's probably worth putting on the list.
     
  15. Jim Thompson

    Jim Thompson Guest

    Hamilton? That must be Doug Hamilton. I worked with him during the
    summers of 1962 and 1963... he was a UofA professor getting his feet
    wet in real world integrated circuits... just getting rolling at that
    time.

    Howard? I vaguely remember him as a blow-hard buddy of Jim Solomon's
    ;-)

    ...Jim Thompson
     
  16. My dear Mr. Thompson,

    As I type this, I am literally -- LITERALLY -- no more than four
    inches away from my copy of the book "Industrial Electricity, Part I"
    (circa 1939). I mention this by way of assuring you that neither my
    admiration for, nor accumulation of, "time tested" electronics books
    is lacking. Still, it would seem that solid-state electronics is here
    to stay, and that acquiring books whose treatment of such electronics
    extends past copper oxide rectifiers might not be completely
    unwarranted. <g> Furthermore, there is the sociological aspect to
    consider. The repressive laws in my state ostensibly forbid
    vivisection. How else am I to gain insight into the new breed of EEs
    -- a wretched heard that it is my goal to eventually join, if I live
    long enough and if I can find nothing more demeaning to do -- without
    at least examining their fodder?

    Cordially,
    Richard Kanarek

    P.S. I, too, have a "50 year-old MIT text book". It was meant to be a
    definitive reference on electrical engineering (much as Dr. Knuth's
    "The Art of Computer Programming" was meant to likewise for CS, except
    that they actually finished their book ;-). Reading it thoroughly is
    on my todo list (which currently has items on it dating back to the
    1980s, sigh).
     
  17. Howdy Joerg,

    Regarding your post:

    "Even back when I was studying for my degree I didn't find college
    textbooks particularly helpful to achieve a true understanding. What
    really taught me radio and, to some extent, digital design was the
    ARRL Handbook. Surprisingly cheap, too. Later it was The Art of
    Electronics.
    Then Ulrich Rhode's Communications Receivers etc. Eventually I worked
    my way up to high level signal processing but that was after I had my
    masters."

    Thanks for the recommendations!

    Admittedly, the fact that a book is/was used by some college somewhere
    hardly guarantees its quality. For every Strunk's "The Elements of
    Style" (just to pick a quality (former) college text book at random)
    there are doubtlessly innumerable lousy text books. Still, even in the
    EE field, there must be some quality, information packed books out
    there. (This explains why I asked for recommendations, rather than
    just buying used college books randomly.


    "BTW, thanks for the hint about Purplus in the CAD group. Order came
    in. I wish I could fire up the new DesignCAD right away but too
    swamped with work right now."

    Glad to have been of assistance with your 2D cad search. (Hint: one of
    DesignCAD's advantages is its use of hot keys. Once you get the hang
    of it, may drafting chores can be done without typing a
    command/accessing a pull down menu. You might want to get the hang of
    it. ;-)

    Showing no greater wisdom than you did, I decided to follow my own
    advice, too (always a mistake). I purchased a copy of ViaCAD 2D/3D
    (www.keenzo.com) that I had mentioned on the other newsgroup. Again
    like you, I haven't had the time to actually try the thing, but wow!
    Of the $84 bucks I paid, I think a good quarter of it went into the
    packaging (my box -- incredibly, they sell the exact same program in
    two different boxes! -- consists of a full color, embossed cardboard
    box with a full color cardboard multi-page pamphlet making up its
    front). The (still untried) program actually seems to consist of two
    equal or more expensive CAD programs (Concepts 2D & 3D,
    www.csi-concepts.com) combined into one. Despite its main feature
    being its sophisticated 3D editing and unmatched (in its price class)
    file import/export facilities, the origami box advertises the software
    as being useful for, among other things, "School Projects" and
    "Flowcharts"!?!

    Questions:
    a) Am I really the last living sane person left?
    b) Heaven knows, I'm no (financial or otherwise) genius, but is
    selling more for less really the way to become wealthy?


    Cordially,
    Richard Kanarek
     
  18. Greetings,

    PMBI, but regarding your recent post:
    I agree with her up to a point. I'm appalled at how expensive old
    engineering books can sometimes be. When I was young, during the brief
    periods when the dinosaurs weren't on the prowl, I would often
    scrounge around books stores, picking up old electronics books
    (somewhat) cheap. To the extent that any of the current crop of young'
    ins wants to, why not afford them the same opportunity? (Not that it
    did me much good, sigh. ;-)
    a) Great. I don't even have a van.
    b) Buried with your books? Appalling! Set them free! They are probably
    the only legacy of their talented authors. What an appalling act of
    disrespect (to the authors), as well as waste, it is to burry/discard
    them!
     
  19. Greetings,

    Thanks for taking the time to reply.

    First, on the chance that it is of assistance to anyone, here are your
    links (without line breaks):

    www.amazon.com/Analysis-Design-Analog-Integrated-Circuits/dp/0471321680
    www.artofelectronics.com
    www.aicdesign.org
    www.amazon.com/Analog-Integrated-Circuits-Signal-Processing/dp/0471097977/ref=sr_1_2/102-8268039-0492929?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1175018438&sr=8-2

    Second, thanks again for the links (and thanks, too, to the other
    posters on this thread). I confess that I would normally have shunned
    IC related texts such as those you mentioned. My inclinations run
    towards physics (as it pertains to electricity/etc.) and circuit
    design using discrete parts. (I was strongly affected by a 1940s Radio
    Electronics book when I was impressionable; this may have distorted my
    viewpoint.) Thank's for broadening my horizons. <g>


    Cordially,
    Richard Kanarek
     
  20. Greetings,

    Do you suppose that I would value the opinion of some anonymous
    librarian over those of the venerated contributors of this newsgroup?
    Horrors!
     
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