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coils

Discussion in 'Misc Electronics' started by Ken, Sep 6, 2004.

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  1. Ken

    Ken Guest

    Hello,

    I would to know how to make coils. I want to make a small motor, but I need
    to make coils. Basically what gauge to use , how many turns will give what
    output. etc.
    Basically I will have a platform with magnets and the coils picking up the
    power.

    thank you

    ken
     
  2. Rich Webb

    Rich Webb Guest

    You probably need to provide a bit more information; you know what you
    mean but it's awfully hard to guess. Is this a small motor for a
    classroom demonstration? Or just for curiosity? (nothing wrong with
    that...) Or is it a small industrial motor -- say the size of a
    refrigerator compressor? AC or (guessing) DC? Using a commutator or
    electronic switching? Torque requirements? HP? Does it need to meet any
    specs like UL or CSA?

    Small, inexpensive motors are everywhere. What is driving you to the
    "build" side of the buy-build decision?
     
  3. CWatters

    CWatters Guest

    There are kits for people to make their own motors for model planes.

    Ask on one of these forums about "Kits for brushless motors" or just post a
    your own question...

    http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=4
     
  4. Ken

    Ken Guest

    I just want to learn how it works by building one. And I will have to do a
    project in my last year of engineering.
    SO maybe, I am guessing 1/8 to 1/4 HP. I do not know which one is better AC
    or DC, Is one more performing then another. Or just the 3 phase AC a plus..

    Ken
     
  5. Are you kidding?We made one in science (high school) with nails, and copper
    wire.It had the size of a cigarette packet.DC motor, with commutator, shunt
    (not series).But the fool of a professor didn't return me the book (with the
    instructions).It was in greek, anyway.It's impossible to make an ac motor on
    your own.The principle of ac motors is the rotating magnetic field (or
    squirrel cage motors).There's no commutator or brushes.Imagine-to weld open
    the compressor of your refrigerator to have the brushes changed.It would be
    very dangerous, too, to use the mains for experiments.Search at your local
    bookstores.
     
  6. Don Kelly

    Don Kelly Guest

    As far as making an AC motor on your own- it is actually simpler than making
    a DC motor if you have a 3 phase supply. Simply take 3 coils (such as the
    field coils of a DC machine) arranged in a triangle.Connect as delta or star
    to a 3 phase supply. In the center of the arrangement put some sort of
    pivot. Get a coke or beer can, drop it on the pivot and energise the coils-
    Voila- an induction motor. Paper clips also work. Put a small compass needle
    in the center of the coil triangle- Voila- a synchronous motor. Been there,
    done that. A single phase motor - use 2 coils at right angles and feed one
    through a capacitor (could use a resistor but with such a primitive
    construction a capacitor is better.
    Otherwise simply use a DC series motor on AC. Commonly used commercially-
    called a universal motor.
    The DC motor with nails and crude commutator appears in many "how to " books
    for well below high school level students and experimentors.

    However- your comment on playing around at mains voltage is quite correct.
     
  7. Guest

    | As far as making an AC motor on your own- it is actually simpler than making
    | a DC motor if you have a 3 phase supply. Simply take 3 coils (such as the
    | field coils of a DC machine) arranged in a triangle.Connect as delta or star
    | to a 3 phase supply. In the center of the arrangement put some sort of
    | pivot. Get a coke or beer can, drop it on the pivot and energise the coils-
    | Voila- an induction motor. Paper clips also work. Put a small compass needle
    | in the center of the coil triangle- Voila- a synchronous motor. Been there,
    | done that. A single phase motor - use 2 coils at right angles and feed one
    | through a capacitor (could use a resistor but with such a primitive
    | construction a capacitor is better.
    | Otherwise simply use a DC series motor on AC. Commonly used commercially-
    | called a universal motor.
    | The DC motor with nails and crude commutator appears in many "how to " books
    | for well below high school level students and experimentors.
    |
    | However- your comment on playing around at mains voltage is quite correct.

    So where is a good source of 3-phase power w/o mains voltage?
     
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