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CO2 Placement

Discussion in 'Security Alarms' started by Allan Waghalter, Mar 7, 2007.

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  1. What's the current thought on placing CO2 detectors? I am working on a
    three story house with a wine-cellar basement. Its a restoration of an old
    mansion here. Do I need to put a detector on each floor? How high should
    they be? Which detector do you recommend?
    Thanks in advance for the input.
    Allan
     
  2. Rich

    Rich Guest

    What type of heat?
    I'd keep them low on and on the level lower then the combustion heat.
     
  3. I think the heat will be gas. There are gas lines running through the house
    leftover from the original construction. There are 8 fireplaces! Will
    expect some trouble with the smoke detectors as the fireplaces are in all of
    the bedrooms.
     
  4. Frank Olson

    Frank Olson Guest


    Do you mean "CO", or "CO2". Two completely different gasses with
    completely different properties so detector placement will be critical.
     
  5. alarman

    alarman Guest

    I think it would be wise to just read the directions and follow the mfg.
    recommendations for installation of the unit in question.
    js
     
  6. The recommended height is 5 feet above the floor ("breathing height," according to one manufacturer). Place a detector outside each
    bedroom and consider placing one near the furnace if it's gas fired. The same applies to fireplaces and other places where
    combustion air has the potential to mix with room air.

    Some manufacturers recommend against placing CO (not CO2 by the way) detectors inside bedrooms due to problems with aerosol
    propellant (hairspray, for example).

    --

    Regards,
    Robert L Bass

    =============================>
    Bass Home Electronics
    941-925-8650
    4883 Fallcrest Circle
    Sarasota · Florida · 34233
    http://www.bassburglaralarms.com
    =============================>
     
  7. Crash Gordon

    Crash Gordon Guest

    Well what if there was a massive soda bottle rupture due to global warming,
    you could suffocate on all the carbon dioxide.



    | Allan Waghalter wrote:
    | > What's the current thought on placing CO2 detectors? I am working on a
    | > three story house with a wine-cellar basement. Its a restoration of an
    old
    | > mansion here. Do I need to put a detector on each floor? How high
    should
    | > they be? Which detector do you recommend?
    | > Thanks in advance for the input.
    | > Allan
    | >
    | >
    |
    |
    | Do you mean "CO", or "CO2". Two completely different gasses with
    | completely different properties so detector placement will be critical.
     
  8. alarman

    alarman Guest

    Not if your CO2 detector is located PROPERLY.
    js
     
  9. Rich

    Rich Guest

    5 ft seams awful high, if I laying in bed I'd want 2-3 ft
     
  10. 5 ft seams awful high, if I laying in bed I'd want 2-3 ft

    Perhaps so. Absent a spec from UL I just follow the manufacturer's instructions. ISTR Macurco says 5 feet up. YMMV.

    --

    Regards,
    Robert L Bass

    =============================>
    Bass Home Electronics
    941-925-8650
    4883 Fallcrest Circle
    Sarasota · Florida · 34233
    http://www.bassburglaralarms.com
    =============================>
     
  11. Additional comments:

    I just noticed a change in Macurco's recommendations. They now suggest bedroom locations as well for their CM-S1 detector. I guess
    they've licked the problem with aerosol propellants.

    FWIW, they're a good brand. If you've not yet settled on one, you may want to consider them.

    --

    Regards,
    Robert L Bass

    =============================>
    Bass Home Electronics
    941-925-8650
    4883 Fallcrest Circle
    Sarasota · Florida · 34233
    http://www.bassburglaralarms.com
    =============================>
     
  12. Rich

    Rich Guest

    I trust you,



     
  13. Crash Gordon

    Crash Gordon Guest

    And that presumably, based upon my near-fatal experience with putting too
    much dry-ice in a monster fog machine, would be UNDER the sody-pop.



    | Crash Gordon wrote:
    | > Well what if there was a massive soda bottle rupture due to global
    | > warming, you could suffocate on all the carbon dioxide.
    |
    | Not if your CO2 detector is located PROPERLY.
    | js
    |
    |
     
  14. Crash Gordon

    Crash Gordon Guest

    I put in a GE couple of weeks ago and they recommended 5 fff and Up...even
    on the ceiling, which is where I put it; above the mbr door.


    |> 5 ft seams awful high, if I laying in bed I'd want 2-3 ft
    |
    | Perhaps so. Absent a spec from UL I just follow the manufacturer's
    instructions. ISTR Macurco says 5 feet up. YMMV.
    |
    | --
    |
    | Regards,
    | Robert L Bass
    |
    | =============================>
    | Bass Home Electronics
    | 941-925-8650
    | 4883 Fallcrest Circle
    | Sarasota · Florida · 34233
    | http://www.bassburglaralarms.com
    | =============================>
    |
    |
     
  15. Jim

    Jim Guest

    I think if everyone would simply read all of the opinions that have
    been posted in this sage group in the past, regarding the placement of
    CO detectors and taking a consensus of all those opinions, it would be
    quite clear to anyone with any intelligence at all ...... that it was
    ok to mount a CO detector anywhere. As long as the main panel had and
    earth ground ..... ummmm .... or didn't.
     
  16. Frank Olson

    Frank Olson Guest

    Please remember to ground your plastic back boxes too.
     
  17. Petem

    Petem Guest

    like in this faq...

    http://www.faqs.org/faqs/electrical-wiring/part2/

    a little part of it....Subject: Should I use plastic or metal boxes?

    The NEC permits use of plastic boxes with non-metallic cable
    only. The reasoning is simple -- with armoured cable, the box
    itself provides ground conductor continuity. U.S. plastic
    boxes don't use metal cable clamps.

    The CEC is slightly different. The CEC never permits cable
    armour as a grounding conductor. However, you must still
    provide ground continuity for metallic sheath. The CEC also
    requires grounding of any metal cable clamps on plastic boxes.

    The advantage of plastic boxes is comparatively minor even for
    non-metallic sheathed cable -- you can avoid making one ground
    connection and they sometimes cost a little less. On the other
    hand, plastic boxes are more vulnerable to impacts. For
    exposed or shop wiring, metal boxes are probably better.

    Metal receptacle covers must be grounded, even on plastic
    boxes. This may be achieved by use of a switch with ground
    connection.
     
  18. I put in a GE couple of weeks ago and
    The problem is there isn't a consensus.
    Different manufacturers specify different
    locations. I follow Macurco's advice
    because that's my favorite brand. I
    understandf their reasoning though, and
    I agree with them. CO mixes readily with
    air. Although it is warmer than air when
    it first emerges from the fire, it quickly
    mixes, especially if being pushed through
    a forced air HVAC system.

    If I installed one in a furnace room I'd place
    it at ceiling height. But in or near bedrooms
    I would go with the 5 foot height. YMMV.

    --

    Regards,
    Robert L Bass

    =============================>
    Bass Home Electronics
    941-925-8650
    4883 Fallcrest Circle
    Sarasota · Florida · 34233
    http://www.bassburglaralarms.com
    =============================>
     
  19. Crash Gordon

    Crash Gordon Guest

    I ground my plastic boxes with fiber optic cable, allows for faster
    transmutation of electrons.



    | Jim wrote:
    |
    | > I think if everyone would simply read all of the opinions that have
    | > been posted in this sage group in the past, regarding the placement of
    | > CO detectors and taking a consensus of all those opinions, it would be
    | > quite clear to anyone with any intelligence at all ...... that it was
    | > ok to mount a CO detector anywhere. As long as the main panel had and
    | > earth ground ..... ummmm .... or didn't.
    | >
    |
    | Please remember to ground your plastic back boxes too.
     
  20. I ground my plastic boxes with fiber optic
    I prefer to use bungee cords. The elasticity helps deal with changing voltages.

    --

    Regards,
    Robert L Bass

    =============================>
    Bass Home Electronics
    941-925-8650
    4883 Fallcrest Circle
    Sarasota · Florida · 34233
    http://www.bassburglaralarms.com
    =============================>
     
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