Connect with us

clipping through-hole leads

Discussion in 'Electronic Equipment' started by Walter Harley, Dec 14, 2005.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. In commercial through-hole PCB manufacturing (I know, this is like asking
    about commercial horse-and-buggy manufacturing...), how are the component
    leads clipped off after insertion and/or soldering?

    Is there some sort of spinning-saw-blade arrangement, or a dozen underpaid
    workers with wirecutters, or ... ?
     
  2. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

    Yes, each of the above, depending upon where the board is fab'd.

    Glenn
     
  3. Still lots of companies use non-SMT components, including our place. We don't
    need to use SMT and for the low volume stuff that we do it's fine to use hand
    assembly.

    We have a couple of ladies that do all the PCB assembly work, and make a very
    good job of it.

    Strangely enough, in my first job at Mullards in the early 1960's we were doing
    identical assembly then, only they were single-sided SRBP boards, double sided
    were probably not in common use then, and glass-fibre material was very
    high-tech and only used on MIL spec stuff.

    Peter
     
  4. Jim Yanik

    Jim Yanik Guest

    Machine-inserted parts have their leads bent over slightly and
    simultaneously clipped,to retain them during wave soldering.
    For low-volume runs,assemblers do it manually.
     
  5. Walter,

    For high volume work there are Lead Saws that are used to trim the
    component leads after the board has been wave soldered. You can see one
    here -> http://www.esuinc.com/lead.asp. The board is secured, solder
    side up, in a jig and the cutting blade moves over the top. It's called
    a saw but some have "blades" that more resemble a surface mill.

    For low volume stuff simple wire cutters are used. For somewhat higher
    volumes, air powered cutters are used to minimize operator fatigue and
    repetitive motion injuries.

    I suspect that where labor costs are low and worker health isn't an
    issue, even higher volumes may be done by hand.

    Hope this helps.
     
  6. KC

    KC Guest

    Why cut the leads after soldering ?
    Most common I know is that the components are bend and cut before
    soldering.
    The leads are not bend to keep them in place for wave soldering like
    some said. They are bend to keep in them in place for the insertion
    machine.

    If you want to make high quality then don't stress the components with
    a inserter. Bend and cut them with a good machine place the components
    by hand.

    But as always there are more solution possible depending on the
    situation.

    KC
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-