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cleaning plastics

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Orange, Aug 23, 2004.

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  1. Orange

    Orange Guest

    Whats the best method/spray for cleaning (computer) plastic?
    Its VERY important that only dirt gets off and that original plastic
    is left intact.
     
  2. Ross Herbert

    Ross Herbert Guest

    |Whats the best method/spray for cleaning (computer) plastic?
    |Its VERY important that only dirt gets off and that original plastic
    |is left intact.


    I use plain water with Domestos for all plastics. Use a toothbrush or
    similar to scrub into any textured surfaces and after a thorough rinse
    in clean water you will find that the plastic comes up like new. For
    difficult stains use neat Domestos on the tip of the brush.
     
  3. Jerry G.

    Jerry G. Guest

    What is Domestos? I have never seen this on the store shelves over here.

    --

    Jerry G.
    ==========================



    |Whats the best method/spray for cleaning (computer) plastic?
    |Its VERY important that only dirt gets off and that original plastic
    |is left intact.


    I use plain water with Domestos for all plastics. Use a toothbrush or
    similar to scrub into any textured surfaces and after a thorough rinse
    in clean water you will find that the plastic comes up like new. For
    difficult stains use neat Domestos on the tip of the brush.
     
  4. Jerry G.

    Jerry G. Guest

    We use some diluted Windex. I mix it to be about 30% Windex. Great care has
    to be taken to not get the water in to the equipment. If more strength is
    needed for a particular job, then less dilution is in good order.

    --

    Jerry G.
    ==========================


    Whats the best method/spray for cleaning (computer) plastic?
    Its VERY important that only dirt gets off and that original plastic
    is left intact.
     
  5. RubbishRat

    RubbishRat Guest

    FYI, Domestos is a bleach here in the UK. I must say I have never used it on
    computer plastics but it's great for bleaching coffee stains from cups. I
    suppose a dilute solution should work on plastics without doing damage.
     
  6. Orange

    Orange Guest

    On Mon, 23 Aug 2004 14:43:59 +0100, "RubbishRat"

    I've heard its used for toilets and damages skin on hands if not used
    carefully! So, I'd prefer to use something that doesn't need being
    1:1000 diluted.
     
  7. CJT

    CJT Guest

    I think that any place Windex can be used, Glass Plus is better. As I
    recall, Windex has some ammonia in it that will attack some materials.

    I don't have any stake in which you use, and was originally turned on
    to Glass Plus (again as I recall -- it has been a while) by a
    recommendation on the Hewlett-Packard Web site, who suggested it for use
    cleaning their scanners.
     
  8. I've always used "409" ("Formula 409") to remove grime from plastic.
    It's a household cleaning product from Clorox and -- uncertain what
    your domicile is -- may only be found under that name in the U.S. and/or
    Canada.

    And, I always spray (generously) _on the cleaning rag_ and then wipe
    on the piece to be cleaned. Letting the "problem areas" sit a bit
    before wiping it off helps cut through the worst of it.
    Really bad grime can take multiiple applications (and, multiple rags!)

    I used to repair Olde Fashioned typewriters, adding machines, etc.
    Some of those keyboards had not be cleaned in *many* decades.
    "409" was the cleaner I finally settled on.

    HTH
    Jonesy
     
  9. jakdedert

    jakdedert Guest

    Someone once advised me to buy Simple Green to clean off some circuit boards
    which had been badly smoke damaged. It didn't work too well; but when I was
    cleaning a particularly nasty white tile floor with 409...and getting
    nowhere, I remembered that bottle of S.G. in the shop.

    I sprayed an area with the 409, let it sit and rubbed, and did the same with
    the Simple Green. The difference was pretty amazing. The S.G. won hands
    down.

    I became a convert...but I only use it for stubborn jobs--very heavy soil or
    tough stains. You must follow the directions, and never use it on
    glass...even well diluted, it will leave a film (although ammonia will
    remove that).

    jak
     
  10. Servisol Carterclene (foaming aerosol) is recommended.
    It is made in the UK and widely available from the likes of
    Farnell,CPC ,RS Components,etc.
     
  11. Ross Herbert

    Ross Herbert Guest

    |On Mon, 23 Aug 2004 14:43:59 +0100, "RubbishRat"
    |
    |I've heard its used for toilets and damages skin on hands if not used
    |carefully! So, I'd prefer to use something that doesn't need being
    |1:1000 diluted.

    I don't actually measure the proportion but it would be several 100's
    : 1 Isuspect. Even after washing the plastics with bare hands for
    around 1 hour total the most I notice is that they tend to dry out as
    they would when using most chlorine bleaches without gloves. A good
    skin restorative such as Sorbolene quickly restores the skin to
    normal. Of course, I would recommend others to use rubber gloves if
    using any chlorine bleach.

    I have done some research and it seems that Domestos is not available
    in the USA, possibly because the EPA doesn't allow chlorine bleaches
    with a high concentration of Sodium Hypochlorite to be available over
    the counter. Domestos contains over 40% NaOCl and from what I have
    found most US cleaners based on this chemical don't get higher than
    15% at most eg. White King Bleach, Melrose Stain Out. Still, you
    could use these undiluted for removing stubborn stains and grease.
     
  12. gothika

    gothika Guest

    There are a variety of all purpose cleaners that'll do the job.
    Formula 409 is one.
    Simple Green diluted for general purpose cleaning is also good.
    I use a cleaner called Mean Green that does very well cleaning all
    kinds of plastic.(PolyButylstyrene, HDPE, Polystyrene etc...)
    It works much like simple Green yet isn't as caustic.(Simple Green can
    strip the oils out of most cabinet plastics as well as attacking the
    binders, IF used in to strong a mix or left on for too long.)
    I get Mean Green at my local Wal-Mart, but I've seen it at local
    dollar stores as well.
    When I was working in my Father's repair shop years ago we used an
    Amway product that was similar to 409 that did a good job as well.
    There are loads of liquid cleaners out that are good for the job.
    Look for a cleaner that works by breaking down the surface
    tension.(extremely slippery to the touch, yet doesn't have any caustic
    properties. The litmus test for this is if it doesn't strip the oils
    from your hands, or leave them gummy.)
    In a pinch just dilute liquid dish detergent like Joy, usually a small
    squirt in a spray bottle then fillled with warm water will do.
     
  13. Ken G.

    Ken G. Guest

    Use soap
     
  14. Orange

    Orange Guest

    Thanks all.

    The problem is how do I find all those chemicals over here.
    The local electronic store has these:

    Cleaner 601
    "Cleaning of electronic and electrical appliances, non-conductive.
    Suitable for all
    equipment casings."

    Screen 99
    "Easily removes dust, grease, nicotine deposits, finger prints and
    dust layers.
    Applications include VDU screens, TV screens and photographic
    laboratories."

    Surface 95
    "For cleaning computer terminals, keyboards, housings, frames,
    copiers, printers,
    furniture, cabinets, desktops and other equipment. Removes grease,
    dirt, fingerprints,
    ink, toner stains, nicotine etc from all plastic and metal surfaces."


    Which one of them would you recommend (95 seems like obvious solution,
    but is it as good as those you recommend?)
    I have tried using soap and dish wash, but maybe they could damage
    plastics (dissolve it so that dirt gets into plastic)?
    It is important that plastic is intact.
    What about using magic wand+water, it seems like the safest thing?
     
  15. Mike

    Mike Guest

    Sodium Hypochlorite (Chlorine) based bleach.

    "Kills all known germs. Dead!"

    Well, it did before the slogan got politically corrected ....

    Now it gently persuades germs to relocate to an alternative location. Or
    something weak like that :)
     
  16. Franc Zabkar

    Franc Zabkar Guest

    I wouldn't recommend this to you, but, in desperation, I once used
    paint thinner to refurbish a computer plotter which was covered with
    ink stains. I originally tried Windex, methylated spirits, turpentine,
    and several kitchen cleaners, in fact anything that came to hand.
    However, none of these had the slightest impact. Paint thinner made
    the job easy and surprisingly did not attack the plastic.


    - Franc Zabkar
     
  17. gothika

    gothika Guest

    If it's a sodium hypochlorite based bleach then it's probably a
    cleaner like X-14.
    X-14 is a bathroom cleaner for removing mold from tile and fiberglass
    shower and bath stalls.
    You COULD use this with relative safety on the polybutylstyrene that
    keyboards are made of, though it would be a bit overkill.(Might remove
    the imprinted typeface on thge keys, better test first.)
    Just use 409 or some other aqueous liquid cleaner.
    I use Mean Green, can be had at Wal-Mart or your local dollar stores
    and is perfectly safe and does a bang up job.(I recycle keyboards for
    budget systems that I put together out of second hand donations and
    this cleaner works perfectly.)
    Formula 409, Fantastik or any mild liquid cleaner will work as well.
     
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