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Circuit Board fuse appears blown

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by tonyvol, Sep 15, 2013.

  1. tonyvol

    tonyvol

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    0
    Sep 15, 2013
    Hey everyone, I'm new to this forum and was wondering if someone could help me troubleshoot this circuit board for a Microwave/Oven Combo? Last week the power company cut through a wire in my yard and it caused a power surge to my house. The microwave wasn't showing any display. When I took it apart, I noticed what appears to be a fuse on the circuit board was burnt. Does anyone know if this is a fuse? And if so how do I determine what to get and where to find one? The part no. for the Kitchenaid Micro/Oven Combo circuit board is 4453377.

    Thanks,
    Tony
     

    Attached Files:

  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,152
    2,671
    Jan 21, 2010
    That's definitely a fuse.

    Be VERY careful inside a microwave oven. There are things in there that can kill you long after the power has been removed.

    My strong recommendation is to close it up and seek someone professional to fix it. (And yeah, that's a fuse, but I'd not want you to seriously injure yourself whilst replacing it).

    The other thing is that if the power company caused the fault, you should be talking to them about the consequential damages you have suffered. If you're playing around in your equipment they might decide not to cover you.
     
  3. tonyvol

    tonyvol

    7
    0
    Sep 15, 2013
    Thanks Steve for replying back. I really appreciate you pointing out the dangers of working on these things. Yeah, I understand some of the dangers of working on these things. But I'm not an expert. The breaker has been shut off to the unit and the capacitor has been discharged, unless you are taking about something that I don't know about. Please let me know. Is it possible to replace the fuse? I've already unhooked the circuit board from the the unit, so I was thinking I could replace the fuse and put it back together. A new circuit board is around $230 and I'm short on funds.

    Thanks Again,
    Tony
     
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,152
    2,671
    Jan 21, 2010
    The fuse will have something written on it near the ends. This will include the voltage rating and the current. It may be encoded. See if you can read what it says and the value may become obvious. If not, post it here and we can probably interpret it.

    That fuse has wires soldered to the ends of it. If you can't get hold of one of these (they're rarer than the type without leads) then get one of a similar size and solder (carefully) some wires onto the ends of it.

    Do you know how to solder? Do you have a soldering iron?

    It is quite possible that the fault is more than just the fuse. If it blows immediately after you apply power, then something more than just the fuse is wrong.

    Yes, the capacitor is dangerous. Even after discharging then, they can develop a high voltage across them again and it can bite. Keep well away from it and respect the fact that if fully charged you don't want to get any part of yourself (or anything you're holding) within several inches of it.

    If you're discharging it with a screwdriver that is clipped to earth (or similar) then I would add a 500mm length of PVC tube as an extension handle.

    Not sure about you, but I'm pretty sure I only have one life.
     
  5. tonyvol

    tonyvol

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    0
    Sep 15, 2013
    Thanks Steve for the help. Yeah, I totally agree with you about only having one life. You can never be too careful when working on elecrical devices. I didn't know that a capacitor could develop a high voltage across them again after it was discharged. I do have a soldering iron. I need to get a magnifying glass to see what is printed on the fuse. I'll let you know what I find.

    Thanks,
    Tony
     
  6. tonyvol

    tonyvol

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    0
    Sep 15, 2013
    I removed the fuse and had to use a magnifying glass to see the writing on the fuse. The fuse has 250V on one end and on the other end it has 230 2AG. I did some searching on the internet and found these. Do you know if these are the right ones?

    http://www.littelfuse.com/products/fuses/axial-radial-thru-hole-fuses/2ag-5x15mm-fuses/230.aspx
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2013
  7. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,152
    2,671
    Jan 21, 2010
    The end that says 250V doesn't say something else after it?

    The most important factor (the current rating) is still unknown.

    And yeah, I know what you mean about magnifying glasses.
     
  8. tonyvol

    tonyvol

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    0
    Sep 15, 2013
    Hey Steve, I took a closer look and it has 6/10A on the 250V side. Is that what you are looking for?
     
  9. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,152
    2,671
    Jan 21, 2010
    Looking at the fuse ratings available, it probably means you want the 0.6A fuse.
     
  10. tonyvol

    tonyvol

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    0
    Sep 15, 2013
    Thanks Steve for all the help. Helpfully this will fix the problem.
     
  11. tonyvol

    tonyvol

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    0
    Sep 15, 2013
    Steve, thanks again for the help. Got the fuse the other day and installed it in the circuit board. Microwave is working again.
     
  12. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,152
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    Jan 21, 2010
    Great news :)
     
  13. Coverend

    Coverend

    1
    0
    Apr 28, 2019
    Hey there! I know it’s been a few years but I’m looking for the same thing as you were.

    6/10A
    250v
    230 2AG

    Having a hard time finding the replacement fuse.
     
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