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choosing micro fo BLDC motor speed control

Discussion in 'Microcontrollers, Programming and IoT' started by gray, Jul 17, 2016.

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  1. gray

    gray

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    Jul 17, 2016
    Hi Friends
    You have to control brushless motors for electric bikes,what micro do you recommend?
    atmega, PIC, ARM or Arduino
    Thank you in advance for your answer
    Only essential
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    I assume you make some distinction between atmega and arduino. Not knowing what that is, I can't make any recommendation with respect to arduino.

    As for the remaining options, it comes down to your experience, availability of tools, and personal preference.

    There are no hard and fast rules. If there were, there would soon be another option available to break that rule.
     
  3. gray

    gray

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    Jul 17, 2016
    I've worked with AVR. but Despite sensors (Feedback engine to take the position)and Weak ability to neutralize noise in avr, is a good choice?
    i know There are no hard and fast rules.but i want to hear Suggestions and experiences of others about this.
    thank you
     
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    I've not used a microcontroller to drive a brushless dc motor, but I'm aware of roughly how its done. I cant see any compelling reason to use one microcontroller over another. Any recommendation I give will be strongly influenced by my skills and experience.

    A brief google suggests that there is lots of information out there (some of it from the microcontroller manufacturers themselves) describing how it is done using all sorts of devices. Have you looked at any of this information?
     
  5. Minder

    Minder

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    Picmicro have a development board and software, the schematic and code can also be seen on the Pic site under MC LV Development board.
    M.
     
  6. gray

    gray

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    Jul 17, 2016
    the problem is these information(from the microcontroller manufacturers themselves) dont compare pros & cons of using different micros
     
  7. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    The problem is that optimal control is more likely to be determined in your software than your microcontroller per se.

    Ae you interested in simplicity? If so, look for a micro with a dedicated BLDC controller.

    Are you looking for the best performance (maybe torque ripple minimization)? Then you're going to have to research control techniques (or build on someone else's work).

    Generally speaking, a micro with a dedicated peripheral will be easier to program, faster to get going, but offer less in terms of ability to finesse the control of the motor.

    What do you want to do? Just control a motor? Our di you want to exact maximum performance where complexity is less of a concern?
     
  8. gray

    gray

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    Jul 17, 2016
    i want to start-up the motor not very exact.but I'm gonna engine working properly
     
  9. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    I cant figure out what you mean, but if what you mean is that you just want to run a BLDC motor without anything special, id just look at what software is available for your favorite microcontroller family.

    What is your favorite microcontroller family?
     
  10. gray

    gray

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    Jul 17, 2016
    could i know what microcontroller have you used to drive a bldc motor
     
  11. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Perhaps if you read what you quoted...
     
  12. Minder

    Minder

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    Apr 24, 2015
    PIC18F2431
    M.
     
  13. NorthGuy

    NorthGuy

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    Mar 24, 2016
    Microchip has hundreds of different models of PICs which are specifically designed to drive BLDC motors. For example, dsPIC33FJ12MC201 (this is a small one, there are many big ones if you need). Here's the section of its manual which explains the PWM module:

    http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/devicedoc/70187e.pdf
     
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