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Ceramic Resistor - 0.01ΩK?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by J1mbo, Jan 2, 2010.

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  1. J1mbo

    J1mbo

    4
    0
    Jan 2, 2010
    Morning all

    First time post so sorry for the basic question. As above, I have a resistor marked:

    B P R2
    0.01ΩK
    KOA

    What should this be, 10 Ohms? It measures 0.4 Ohms (basically short circuit on my multimeter).

    It's a small ceramic cased wirewound I think.

    Any help greatly appreciated!

    NB sorry for post in mirror group first, failed to read note at top of page :(
     
  2. Resqueline

    Resqueline

    2,848
    2
    Jul 31, 2009
    Good morning Jimbo

    Basics questions are ok.
    The resistor you have there is 0.01 Ohms (or 10 milli-Ohms) just like it says.
    You'll have to run 10 Amps through it to measure 0.1 Volts across it.
    It'll then dissipate 1 Watt of power.

    When measuring small resistor values (0-50 Ohms) with ordinary multimeters you'll have to subtract the 0.4 Ohms you usually read with the pins shorted in order to get a more accurate resistor reading.

    No problem with posting in the mirror group other than it's unlikely to be replied to there.
    But I can delete it for you if you want.
     
  3. J1mbo

    J1mbo

    4
    0
    Jan 2, 2010
    Great, thanks for the reply. So what is the 'K' for then?

    I remembered I do have a low-range meter and re-tested, it is indeed about 0.01 Ohms - hard to tell exactly because it depends on the lead contact at that low level.

    Thanks for your help.
     
  4. Resqueline

    Resqueline

    2,848
    2
    Jul 31, 2009
    K is the tolerance, meaning +/-10% for this manufacturer.
    R2 might stand for the power dissipation, guessing 2W.
    KOA is the manufacturer.

    Low-ohm meters have use the 4-wire (kelvin) measurement method if they are to eliminate lead & contact resistances.
     
  5. J1mbo

    J1mbo

    4
    0
    Jan 2, 2010
    The meter I used is a circuit loop tester so doesn't have the four-wire arrangement as typical values are much more - 0.25 Ohm or so.

    Anyway, this is great - many thanks for your help!
     
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