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Center tapped transformer equations

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by [email protected], Jan 30, 2006.

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  1. Guest

    Hello. I have a frequency domain program that is using the following
    equations for a transformer:
    V1 = s(L1)(I1) +/- s(M)(I2)
    V2 = s(L2)(I2) +/- s(M)(I1)

    Where
    +/- depends on the polarity
    V1, V2 = voltages of primary and secondary
    I1, I2 = currents of primary and secondary
    L1, L2 = inductances of primary and secondary
    M = mutual inductance

    Does anyone know or can point me to a link that describes the frequency
    domain equations for a center tapped transformer? Thanks.
     
  2. Just in case the transformer is with iron
    core, forget the frequency domain.
    Fourier transform assumes linearity,
    which an iron transformer is not.

    In case the transformer is air core, some
    equations may be sufficient.

    Rene
     
  3. Those are very simplified transformer equations!

    In the real world, transformers have distributed resistance and
    capacitance and quite a bit of non-linearity at high fluxes, all of
    which make simple models work not very well at high or low frequencies,
    or high amplitudes.

    Here's a web page with more advanced models you may find helpful:

    http://tinyurl.com/7r5d7
     

  4. Why do you use that Tiny URL crap? Just post the real URL so someone
    can still find the web page in a couple months:
    <http://www.beigebag.com/case_xfrmer_2.htm> Quite often I will click on
    one of those links to find that it has expired, or even worse it has
    been reused.


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
  5. Because quite often the long url is full of funny characters that most
    web browsers cant figure out are not delimiters.
    Please show us ONE example of this.

    As far as I know, and tinyurl claims, they never expire or reuse the
    tiny URLS. For them to do so would be pointless, counterproductive,
    and just plain dumb.

    Maybe you're thinking of something else...



    ..

    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida

    Reply
     

  6. More likely the browser software used to post the long URL is faulty
    and breaks it into several parts. I simply add < and > around any
    length link to tell my newsreader not to break the link. If there is a
    problem with the long link the redirect site still couldn't send you
    there. Think about it. Also, you are posting through Goggle which is a
    second or third rate method to access usenet.

    I had archived several treads with those short URLs and they were all
    bad or had been reused so i deleted them. Why would I keep them if they
    didn't work?


    No, it was one of these linking services that corrupted a lot of
    interesting threads I had archived.

    On the other hand, why would you care if someone looks at the Google
    archives in a couple years to find the link is bad? If they at least
    knew the home page for the site they might luck out and find the
    information anyway.


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
  7. Don Foreman

    Don Foreman Guest

    Others have noted that transformers are nonlinear devices. Setting
    that aside, perhaps your question is how to deal with a centertapped
    xfmr or one with more than two windings.

    For multiple windings you must set up the mesh equations with terms
    for coupling from each winding to every other winding, as:

    V1 = s(I1) L11 + s(I2)L12 + s(I3) L13 + ...
    V2 = s(I1) L21 + s(I2) L22 + s(I3) L23 + ....
    ......
    Vn = s(I1)Ln1 + s(I2)Ln2 + s(I3) Ln3 + ....+s(In) Lnn

    This is further oversimple (beyond ignorinig nonlinearities) because
    it ignores winding resistances.
     
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