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Ceiling fan headache

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by SFC, Dec 15, 2019.

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  1. SFC

    SFC

    8
    0
    Apr 30, 2015
    Hi all,

    I have a ceiling fan with three switches; one for lights on/off, one for suck/blow, and one to control fan speed (branded SMC).

    This last one is giving me a headache. It's a four lead switch (L321), with only 3 wires connected: Brown, Blue, Black (EU).
    The reason this thing was gathering dust in my garage had to do with the fact it only operated on 'hurricane' mode, because the fan speed control switch decided to pop its two halves and give me a run for my money.

    Now I don't like to throw away things when they stop working because I'm frugal and don't like to dump electronic devices not knowing if they get recycled in the proper way or just end up in landfill.

    So I decided to open up said ceiling fan, only to be met with parts exploding into places untraceable like NASA satellites at their end of life.

    I managed to find all parts of this L321 switch with a flash light and luck to restore it to its former glory with cyanoacrylate, zip ties and hot glue. But now I have a working switch with 4 connections and only 3 wires to connect.

    Searching Google I found a plethora of these switches, only to find 4 wire diagrams, leaving me in the dark on how to connect only 3 wires..

    Some help would be very much appreciated..
     
  2. Bluejets

    Bluejets

    3,762
    780
    Oct 5, 2014
    Show the switch.
    Normally they are a 3 position speed with a fourth being off.
    Centre pole is normally the mains active feed with the other 3 being low speed cap connection (2.5uF) next speed up connection (1.8uF) and finally high speed which is the common of the multicap and the motor connection.
    Motor neutral obviously simply connects to neutral supply.
     
  3. SFC

    SFC

    8
    0
    Apr 30, 2015
    Simple pull chain switch with a rotor inside and 4 contact points. I just want to make sure I don't damage the fan, so could I find out by trial and error without risk of frying anything?

    I have three wires to connect: Black (switching wire), Blue (zero wire) and Brown (phase wire). This is standard where I live (230V/50Hz). Excuse any faulty terminology.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Bluejets

    Bluejets

    3,762
    780
    Oct 5, 2014
    I doubt that,
    There are many connections you could make and do some damage.
    Fair enough you have a 3 active position with off position by the switch you show but sadly McGyver's methods of coloured wires don't work in reality.
    Normally an active feeds a common terminal with capacitor tappings giving 2 speeds and direct connection to the motor gives high speed but from your description you don't seem to have enough cables for that.

    I remember seeing those units probably 30 years ago but cannot remember internals.
     
  5. SFC

    SFC

    8
    0
    Apr 30, 2015
    Bummer. It is an old ceiling fan, about 20-ish years old, so one could argue to just buy a new one. But this does not agree with my craving for saving the environment. ;)

    Is there a way to put a multi-meter to good use and find out how the wiring is supposed to go? The switch should be easy, just map out the conductivity in continuity mode to see which connections make a closed circuit at the 4 stages of the switch.

    But how would one measure the output of the wires? I can see the (some) wires coming out of a black 'box', which contains a bunch of resistors I presume. The black box probably contains a PCB with components, filled with resin..
     
  6. Bluejets

    Bluejets

    3,762
    780
    Oct 5, 2014
    Here's the problem.
    You can see what you have in front of you.
    We cannot.
     
    Martaine2005 and SFC like this.
  7. SFC

    SFC

    8
    0
    Apr 30, 2015
    Touche my friend, I'll have to come back at that with some good pictures.. .my bad :oops:
     
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