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Casio Privia Px330 Piano Keyboard power adapter input

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by liam123, Oct 29, 2018.

  1. liam123

    liam123

    1
    0
    Oct 29, 2018
    Ill start this off by saying I know nothing about electronics, and am looking for some advice/suggestions. I went to play my keyboard the other day and found it was unplugged (not from the wall, from the adapter) and when I went to plug it back in, the plug wouldn't fit into the keyboard. It looks like the plug, and input both became very hot since they appear slightly melted. I am wondering if there's any way I can replace the specific small piece where the adapter plugs into on the PCB since it just looks like a very small piece, and then replace the adapter, but I don't know if the piece on the PCB is very specific to this keyboard, or if it is a more universal piece used on other electronics too. I also don't know if there could be more problems with the circuit board or if what I'm saying just sounds foolish to someone who knows about this stuff. Here's a set of images showing the problem.

    https://imgur.com/a/DwyziqN

    thanks
     
  2. duke37

    duke37

    5,212
    718
    Jan 9, 2011
    It looks like a standard coaxial connector, possibly 3.5mm diameter. There are several variations with different pin diameters. Get a plug and matching socket and connect with the pin positive.

    You could test the keyboard using a 12V DC supply connected with some soldered wire on the board. Make sure the polarity is correct
     
  3. dave9

    dave9

    773
    171
    Mar 5, 2017
    It looks fairly standard except that the square portion of the jack right behind the circular portion that sticks out of the chassis, would butt up against the chassis to provide strain relief to some extent.

    Look at the back of the circuit board to see if the solder joints (and possibly copper tracks) are torn up. Look at the placement of the pins out of the jack to determine if they match one of the common pin placements for a standard DC barrel jack.

    If they don't you could grind away the tracks and mount a new jack with epoxy and air-wire it to the next point in the circuit, but frankly it might be easier to find an empty space on the chassis, drill a hole and install a panel mount barrel jack instead. It could even go exactly where that one was if you screw a piece of plate metal onto that area and drill the hole for the panel mount jack in it. Personally I like around 0.06" thick aluminum for this sort of thing as it is easy to machine and polish so it looks nice "enough".

    Once you pick the barrel jack you want, there will be a matching DC barrel plug for it that you put on the power supply. Note the current rating for the PSU and pick a jack/plug combo rated for this much current or more. I don't know that PSU rating but cheap/junk/generic barrel jacks like you find on eBay at $10 for 10 pieces, may not be designed for enough current. I've seen some of those rated at 5A and don't believe that for a second as they're nowhere near as well built as 5A major brand jacks... BUT, they are cheap.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2018
  4. duke37

    duke37

    5,212
    718
    Jan 9, 2011
    The PSU is rated at 12V DC 1.5A with centre pin positive.
     
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