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Car stereo repair

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by PtrkLnk, Aug 26, 2013.

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  1. PtrkLnk

    PtrkLnk

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    0
    Jan 20, 2012
    So I am trying to fix the radio in my car. It turns on and looks fine but no sound comes out. I have figured out that it is something with the amplifier in it because if I connect the line out (bypasses amp) to an external amp the sound comes out fine.

    I was wondering if anyone knows what parts of this are for the amplifier, and how hard they are to replace.

    Here are some pictures of the main board for it:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    would have been helpful if you had photo'ed the other side of those 2 big chips
    seeing the backside isn't any help

    one of them will be the stereo power amp the other mite be a stereo preamp make sure we can read the part numbers on the 2 chips

    Dave
     
  3. PtrkLnk

    PtrkLnk

    26
    0
    Jan 20, 2012
    car stereo

    There are metal plates on the back of the chips. I have to take that plate off and take a picture of the back of the chip, right?
     
  4. PtrkLnk

    PtrkLnk

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    Jan 20, 2012
    First Chip

    I de-soldered the smaller chip and it says "HA13164A" As far as I can tell from websites it is a voltage regulator of some sort. Would this have any effect on the amp?
     
  5. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    NO, the metal plate is the heatsink you've already removed. The metal plates shown in these images are integral parts of the chip.

    You need to destroy the chip to remove these (and you don't want to do that).

    Those metal bits are the back of the chip. Turn it around and you'll see the writing we need.
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Yep, sounds like a voltage regulator.

    I recommend you stop desoldering things or you'll have the amplifier in a state that can't be tested.

    Well, actually, you've already gone that far.

    Now you need to reattach the chip to the heatsink, then reassemble everything, THEN resolder the chip back in.

    You can't just resolder it in because it won't be aligned with the heatsink any more and things just are not going to work.
     
  7. PtrkLnk

    PtrkLnk

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    Jan 20, 2012
  8. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    You're putting the cart before the horse.

    You're thinking about replacing things without even knowing if they're faulty.
     
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