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Capacitor value

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Golf, Nov 15, 2006.

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  1. Golf

    Golf Guest

    I have a capacitor that has it's apparent value printed on it, but I'm
    not sure how to read it. This is one of those rectangular type (not
    sure what kind this is). Anyhow, it has the following numbers on it -
    ..0056J8???? can't read the rest. I'll probably get hammered, but, I'm
    not exactly sure what value this means. Also, can I replace this with a
    different type cap since I don't want to have to order this specific
    component? It is in the power supply of an RCA TV as most of you
    probably already know. I am a semi-beginner in TV repair, but often run
    across these type things I'm not familiar with. Thanks for your
    continued support.
     
  2. PROBABLY a .0056 uF
     
  3. Ross Herbert

    Ross Herbert Guest

    and J = +/- 5% tolerance

    This isn't much help since the voltage rating is of vital importance.
    It is possible the '8' signifies the voltage (possibly 800V but this
    would be an unusual value). According to this page
    http://xtronics.com/kits/ccode.htm the '8' might signify a 2000V
    rating.
     
  4. Arfa Daily

    Arfa Daily Guest

    This is where correct use of terminology comes in. Where exactly in the
    receiver, do you mean by " power supply " ? In the area where the line cord
    comes in, and the switching power supply for all of the primary rails is, or
    are you referring to the area around the flyback, that generates the CRT
    final anode voltage, and other sub-rails for the unit ?

    I would go along with the value being 0.0056uF ( 5600pF ) and 5% tolerance.
    If it is one of the 'boxy' types, then with this value, I would suspect that
    it might well be something like flyback tuning, in the horizontal output
    stage, rather than the power supply, and is likely to be rated for around
    2kV. If this is the case, this capacitor type is chosen carefully for this
    application, and should not under any circumstances, be substituted for a
    different type. Even the correct types sometimes go up like fireworks, and
    do considerable damage to a pcb, so fitting the wrong type could prove
    disastrous.

    In general, particularly whilst you're in the learning stages, and not
    sufficiently experienced to appreciate the subtle differences between
    various component specifications, I would strongly recommend that you
    replace only like for like, particularly in TV sets, and no matter how
    difficult the 'real' component is to obtain. Remember that some components
    are also
    " designated safety components " and should not under any circumstances be
    substituted with other types. Schematics for the item under repair, will
    make any such components clear. At the end of the day, you are ultimately
    responsible for any repair that you put back out there, so it makes good
    sense to repair only to the manufacturers' original standards, and know that
    the item is not going to burn down someone's house as a result of a
    substitute component that you have fitted.

    I hope that hasn't put you off, but I think that it's an important point
    that you should grasp the implications of, as early as you can.

    Arfa
     
  5. Guest

    aka 5.6nF
    Well, I'll say different... in 98-99% of cases you can substitute other
    types just fine. There are however some cavets:

    safety resistors - these are fuses and resistors in one, and should
    never be replaced with bog standard Rs.
    X and Y rated capacitors - these have characteristics that improve
    their safety on L-N or L-E apps, and only X or Y types respectively
    should be subbed.
    Fuses, use the right type, dont swap std with time delay etc
    Small capacitors in tuned stages: excellant stability is important, so
    forget poorly specced ones.

    It sounds like Arfa and I come at repairs from somewhat different
    angles. I've never needed to concern myself with whether something is
    as it was originally made, but rather with whether it is effective,
    reliable, safe, and looks good. You can do a whole lotta mods and stay
    within those requirements.


    NT
     
  6. Guest

    aka 5.6nF
    Well, I'll say different... in 98-99% of cases you can substitute other
    types just fine. There are however some cavets:

    safety resistors - these are fuses and resistors in one, and should
    never be replaced with bog standard Rs.
    X and Y rated capacitors - these have characteristics that improve
    their safety on L-N or L-E apps, and only X or Y types respectively
    should be subbed.
    Fuses, use the right type, dont swap std with time delay etc
    Small capacitors in tuned stages: excellant stability is important, so
    forget poorly specced ones.

    It sounds like Arfa and I come at repairs from somewhat different
    angles. I've never needed to concern myself with whether something is
    as it was originally made, but rather with whether it is effective,
    reliable, safe, and looks good. You can do a whole lotta mods and stay
    within those requirements.

    I forgot diodes, dont replace ultrafast with not fast.


    NT
     
  7. Arfa Daily

    Arfa Daily Guest

    Seems to me that you've just answered exactly the same as me ! You have
    basically said that it's ok to substitute - but not A's with B's, or X's
    with Y's, nor J's with K's, not forgetting O's with P's. Oh yes, and you
    should never swap M's with N's. I think that pretty much covers it ...

    Of course I substitute sometimes - all engineers do, but the point that I
    was making was that you need a lot of years' experience to make the
    judgement as to what is an acceptable substitute, and what isn't, so if you
    do not have that experience, don't make substitutes at all.

    I would absolutely refute that in general, it is safe to substitute cap
    types in high voltage and pulse circuits. These devices are prone to
    catastrophic failure with fireworks, but because of this, have certified
    flame retardant cases, amongst other important characteristics. Also, as you
    say, caps used to tune RF stages have particular dielectric types, giving
    rise to enhanced electrical, mechanical and thermal stability. Substituting
    with an inappropriate type, could lead to a serious degradation in the
    performance of a receiver or transmitter.

    I don't know whereabouts in the world you are, or whether you are a
    professional repairer, but in general, repair shops are responsible for the
    safety of any repaired items that they put back out into the public domain,
    and I for one, take that responsibility seriously, which is why I gave the
    advice that in the case that the OP was asking about, he should only replace
    the cap like for like. I accept what you say about being able to carry out
    mods and stay within the realms of what would be considered effective and
    reliable, but sometimes, it may be difficult to stay within what is safe.
    Without detailed knowledge of the designer's thought processes, it might be
    difficult to know why a particular component type was used, what the safety
    issues were, and more relevant still, what exactly the safety legislation
    issues were relating to the choice of a specific component, which is why I
    say in general, don't sub component types, unless you really understand what
    you are doing.

    Arfa
     
  8. Guest

    PJ, gppd sunnbry Brfb.


    NT
     
  9. Arfa Daily

    Arfa Daily Guest

    Oh cracker !! I love it !! Took me a couple of minutes, but yes - very
    clever ! Don't you just love newsgroups ? Have a good 'un NT.

    Arfa
     
  10. Ross Herbert

    Ross Herbert Guest

    Is that anything like "Dilligaf"?
     
  11. Guest

    :)
     
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