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Can't figure out capacitor value

Discussion in 'Datasheets, Manuals and Component Identification' started by boogyman19946, Dec 15, 2011.

  1. boogyman19946

    boogyman19946

    38
    0
    May 2, 2011
    Ok, I have a few capacitors for which value I can't quite understand. The other ones that I was checking we're fairly straightforward but these don't seem to be orthodox.

    A few of them have a number that's prefixed with a period and a few numbers after it. They are:
    .033J
    .022J
    .001J

    The .022J has 100HT written below it, but I'm not sure if the others one do so too. If needed, I can find out.

    and another one has 331. written on it. The first 3 are green and the 331. one looks like a ceramic one.

    Does anyone have an idea what the values of these capacitors are?

    EDIT: I think I figured out the .xxxJ capacitors. I found a website that says .022J would evaluate to 200pf with 5% tolerance, but I'm boggled why it wasn't named 201J instead, and why the period is there. Also, this doesn't work for .001J because it would mean it's a 0pf capacitor XD
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2011
  2. davelectronic

    davelectronic

    1,079
    12
    Dec 13, 2010
  3. duke37

    duke37

    5,231
    718
    Jan 9, 2011
    I would guess that the .022J capacitor is 0.022microF i.e. 22nF. (A preferred value)
    The J is probably the dielectric.

    The 331 is the value in pF as marked on resistors (3 3 and one 0) so 330pF. Somewhat confusing!
     
  4. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    9,306
    1,889
    Nov 17, 2011
  5. boogyman19946

    boogyman19946

    38
    0
    May 2, 2011
    I'll try those values duke, we'll see if they work

    @Harald, thanks for the article! It's much more detailed than the one I read.
     
  6. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,294
    1,758
    Sep 5, 2009
    The "J" is the tolerance in this case 5%

    G = 2%, K = 10% L = 15%, N = 30%
    J, K and L are the common ones you will see.

    .001J is .001 uF (microFarad) = 10nF (nanoFarad) @ 5% tolerance

    Thats incorrect, this is correct -----> .022 = .022uF = 22nF = 22,000pF

    cheers
    Dave
     
  7. boogyman19946

    boogyman19946

    38
    0
    May 2, 2011
    @dave, I'm not sure how the numbers are supposed to be decoded still. I'm getting that they're read as the direct value in nanoFarads but you wrote that .001J should be 10nf. Shouldn't that be 1nf if .022J is 22nf?
     
  8. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,191
    2,693
    Jan 21, 2010
    Correct, 0.001uF = 1nF
     
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