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Can anyone ID this inductor and the manufacturer?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by atikovi, Mar 9, 2017.

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  1. atikovi

    atikovi

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    Mar 8, 2017
    steering rack inductor.JPG

    From a Google image search the logo resembles Epcos. Any info on a replacement part would be appreciated. This is in an electric power steering module. The power steering was inop and diagnosis lead to the module being defective. Instead of spending $300 for a used replacement, I took the cover off and found the inductor broken. I was able to solder a wire between the board and inductor and have power steering again, but want a permanent repair with a new inductor correctly soldered to the board.
     
  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    223 = 22,000μH

    you just need one the same value and size ... manufacturer isn't critical
     
  3. atikovi

    atikovi

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    Mar 8, 2017
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Yeah, I agree 22mH is unlikely. 22uH seems far more likely.
     
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  5. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    www site must have lead me astray :(


    101 = 100uH
    102 = 1000uH
    103 = 10,000uH

    therefore 223 = 22,000uH ????

    going by their reasoning which you says is wrong, Steve
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2017
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    I'm not certain it is wrong, but it's not a value I'd expect to see.

    I'm pretty sure the 22uH inductors I have are marked 220, so your reading is also reasonable.

    I'm curious as to why the existing inductor can't be soldered back in place. Perhaps the pad has been ripped off (in which case a new inductor won't help) or maybe the lead under the component has broken (in which case, what is the wire soldered to?).

    It's near a diode and a 680uF tantalum cap, so it really looks like a buck or boost dc-dc converter.

    22mH would make more sense in a filter, otherwise the switching frequency would be pretty low.

    If it is that TDK inductor, the seems to be some indication that it's value is coded in nF.
     
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  7. atikovi

    atikovi

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    Mar 8, 2017
    Old one too far gone to put back with any confidence.

    inductor.jpg

    And my biggest surprise to all this is that one single little passive component can cause the entire module to shut down.
     
  8. garublador

    garublador

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    Oct 14, 2014
    Well, if it's part of a switching power supply (which is what those are typically used for), then removing it is like removing an entire power supply from the design. When you think of it that way it isn't surprising that nothing would work.

    I'd be worried about why my inductor blew up. If you're going to try replacing it, I'd buy a few of them.
     
  9. atikovi

    atikovi

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    Mar 8, 2017
    Mechanical damage. Previous owner must have driven over a curb or hit something in the road. Cover shows impact which is directly under this part.
    cover.jpg
     
  10. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    Now that you can see the wire size, it is certainly μH instead of mH.

    Bob
     
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