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'bye for a while

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by John Fields, Oct 10, 2004.

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  1. John Fields

    John Fields Guest

    I've just taken on a contract which is going to keep me busy pretty
    much full time until the end of the month, plus I'm finishing up
    editing a book for Sams Technical Publishing, plus I've got an
    interesting instrumentation application to study and then quote, so
    I'm going to be outta here for a month or so...

    See ya,
     
  2. Congratulations on acquiring a real life.

    --
    Dirk

    The Consensus:-
    The political party for the new millenium
    http://www.theconsensus.org
     
  3. Dirk Bruere at Neopax wrote...
    Speaking of which...
     
  4. Al Borowski

    Al Borowski Guest

    Don't tease :)

    Can you please give an ETA for the next edition?

    thanks,

    Al
     
  5. Well, if we could prevent Win for spending so much time
    here............





    martin

    Serious error.
    All shortcuts have disappeared.
    Screen. Mind. Both are blank.
     
  6. Al Borowski wrote...
    That's what our publisher says (for the last 7 years).
    But we are working on it. You won't be disappointed,
    it'll be good. Says me.
     
  7. Joerg

    Joerg Guest

    Hi Winfield,
    Now if I could have just one more wish: Would it be possible to add some
    micro controller stuff into the next AoE?

    Something along the lines of how to solve rather mundane tasks with the
    new uCs that can be sent into low power modes. Making timers that we
    used to do with multiple 4060 chips, using them as PWM or V/F anf F/V
    blocks, designing DC-DC converters with them etc. Especially the latter
    would really be useful for most of us.

    When uCs were over $3 much of this wouldn't have made sense. Now that
    many plain vanilla versions are under $1 it does as long as the circuits
    don't need built-in ADC and other deluxe features.

    Regards, Joerg
     
  8. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    Speaking of cheap micros, are there any that can be programmed with
    nothing but a serial bit and one 5V supply? I have a development
    board for the Motorola 68HC705, but it's kind of a PITA - a naked
    board about 6" x 9" that just lays there on the bench, with a serial
    cable and a flying ribbon cable and plug to plug into the target
    system. But I've had the GUI for it up about a couple of times, and
    got to the point where I could run their example blinking LED, but
    I got sidetracked and it's been collecting dust for about 4 years.

    Thanks,
    Rich
     
  9. And not treat MOSFETs and JFETs together in the same section....?
     
  10. Joerg

    Joerg Guest

    Hi Rich,
    Not really, I think. Most need JTAG which is quite a bunch of wires. I
    do not believe it was necessary to have this many but it's the standard.
    I wish there was a scheme like Dallas uses it on their memory chips.

    I am just exploring how to monitor three to four (pretty low) voltages
    with a vanilla MSP430. Not so fast, says the data sheet. It was geared
    towards just measuring resistors and not voltages like the Philips parts
    were. I was hoping to replace a whole plethora of parts with an MSP but
    if this forces me to use a $2 version with an ADC or use external opamps
    that throws a wrench in there. Too expensive. It is amazing, even if a
    discrete board holds 50 parts or so it is still a lot cheaper than that.

    Regards, Joerg
     
  11. What you need is a high-priced^H^H^H^Hcost-effective (that way the
    advice is valuable _and_ cost effective) out of town (not the jerks
    you already know who are just around the corner and don't know squat)
    consultant.
     
  12. Al Borowski

    Al Borowski Guest

    Do you mean, programmed via a serial port?

    If so, you might be interested in a bootloader. Its basically a
    microcontroller, programmed so it can program itself over a serial port.
    Of course only micros that can write their own flash can do this.

    cheers,

    Al
     
  13. Joerg

    Joerg Guest

    Hi Al,
    The MSP can, so this may be an option.

    Regards, Joerg
     
  14. Not really cheap, but some (all?) of the ADC micros can be so
    programmed. There's bootloader code in ROM. Many others require only
    $100 or $150 worth of module, and that allows access to debugging
    features in some processors that mean that you get a lot of the
    benefit of an expensive real-time emulator, almost for free. There's
    JTAG and Microchip has their own system. Usually it ties up a few pins
    and a bit of on-chip resources, but that's often a reasonable price to
    pay.
     
  15. Ken Smith

    Ken Smith Guest

    Philips 8?C51RD2 does that the first time you power it up. After you've
    made it into a product, you can either (a) call 0FC00H or hold PSEN/ low
    to get back into the programming mode.
     
  16. The Zilog Z8 Encore chip can be programmed using a single pin. It also
    can be debugged in system using this pin.

    Alas, it takes 3.3V rather than 5V.

    Its more expensive than the PICs though.

    --
    Regards,
    Robert Monsen

    "Your Highness, I have no need of this hypothesis."
    - Pierre Laplace (1749-1827), to Napoleon,
    on why his works on celestial mechanics make no mention of God.
     
  17. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    I just looked up a 68HC705P6 at Newark, and Yikes! They're $3.77. 5 years
    ago, they were like 89 cents, which is pretty cool for 4x ADCs and stuff.

    Cheers!
    Rich
     
  18. Why has no one mentioned that many flash PICs have a low voltage programming
    mode. You need a programmer to set it. But once set, that PIC, for ever more
    (or at least until you disable it), can be programmed at operating voltage (5V
    usually) and serial data.

    Gibbo
     
  19. Dave VanHorn

    Dave VanHorn Guest

    Sure. All the Atmel AVRs can be programmed serially, with six wires. Power,
    Ground, Reset, SCL, MOSI, and MISO.
     
  20. Tim Shoppa

    Tim Shoppa Guest

    I prefer high-voltage programming even when low-voltage programming
    is possible. That way I don't "lose" the RB4 pin for general usage.

    With HV ICSP, you don't lose any pins (although there are
    some easy-to-meet constraints on what you do with RA5/MCLR, RB6 and RB7).

    Tim.
     
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