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Buck converters

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by hrituraj64, Aug 30, 2018.

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  1. hrituraj64

    hrituraj64

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    Aug 30, 2018
    I have seen many high watt like 1200 or 1500 watt boost converters and not a buck converter with that high wattage or power rating . I'm planning to make one buck converter (input- 35 volts output-3 to 35 volts current -30amp max and adjustable ) but is there any restrictions to the power of a buck converter or are there any certain limitation to the current it can output.(I dont want to buy any discrete buck converter ic. I intend to use typical pwm chips like uc38xx ,tl494 etc or even opamps)???
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    You will need a great deal of skill to create a buck regulators capable of that current.

    There is no particular reason why it can't be done, but anyone can ride a push-bike at 15 km/h, it takes a lot more skill to ride one at 150km/h. Same thing with electronics at high power levels.

    Why do you need something like this?
     
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  3. hrituraj64

    hrituraj64

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    Aug 30, 2018
    Well I understand!...I actually got a 26v 20 amp transformer with which I want to make a voltage controlled and current controlled power supply...now the most efficient way is to use dc dc converters .Any other suggestions?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 30, 2018
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    It depends on what you want to do with it. Switch mode regulators are not suited to some uses.

    Have you ever built a power supply before? What is your skill with electronics?
     
  5. hrituraj64

    hrituraj64

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    Aug 30, 2018
    Yeah I'm a electronics engineering student...I did built power supplies with linear regulating system quite upto 10 amp .
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Ok, well you're (at the very least) going to need multiple switching elements and you're going to have to ensure they turn off together.

    Oddly enough, it would be easier to start with a higher voltage and use a mosfet to switch the current going into a transformer. That way you will be switching a lower current and then just your rectifier after the transformer needs to handle the high current.
     
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